Q:

What are the three types of symbiotic relationships?

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Quick Answer

Three types of symbiotic relationships are mutualism, commensalism and parasitism. In symbiosis, at least one member of the pair benefits from the relationship, while the host may also benefit, may be unaffected or may be harmed.

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What are the three types of symbiotic relationships?
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Full Answer

Within a mutualistic relationship, both organisms benefit from the symbiotic pairing. The relationship between zebras and oxpecker birds is mutualistic. The oxpecker removes ticks and other parasitic organisms from the zebra's skin. The oxpecker is provided with food, while the zebra is provided with a form of pest control.

Commensalism is a symbiotic relationship where one organism consumes the unused food of another, but does no harm to its host. An example of commensalism is the remora fish and a shark. The remora fish forms a temporary attachment to the shark and picks up food scraps when the shark feeds. The shark is not harmed but also receives no benefit from the relationship.

During parasitism, the parasitic organism lives on or within its host to secure nourishment. In a parasitic relationship, some harm is done to the host organism. Animal parasites include viruses, bacteria, tapeworms, fleas, lice and mites.

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Related Questions

  • Q:

    What are some symbiotic relationships in a tundra?

    A:

    Symbiotic relationships on the tundra include nematode parasitism on caribou, bacterial mutualism with pitcher plants and nematode commensalism on black flies. Symbiosis is long-term dependence of one species on another classified by the effect on the host. Parasitism causes injury, commensalism has no apparent effect and mutualism provides benefits.

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  • Q:

    What is an example of commensalism?

    A:

    One example of commensalism is the relationship between Patiria miniata, known as the Bat star, and a segmented worm called Ophiodromus pugettensis. The star has several grooves protruding from its mouth. Some Ophiodromus pugettensis worms live inside these grooves, but they do not harm the starfish.

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  • Q:

    What are examples of mutualism in the tundra biome?

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    Two common examples of mutualism in the tundra biome include the beneficial coexistence between the alga and the fungus in a lichen and the reciprocal partnership between tundra swans and sago pondweed. Mutualism is a type of symbiotic relationship wherein two or several different species derive shared benefits by living in close proximity with one another.

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  • Q:

    What is a symbiotic relationship in which both species benefit?

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    A symbiotic relationship in which both species benefit is called mutualism. In a mutualistic relationship, both species survive and thrive more effectively than if the species lived on their own. Both members do, however, incur costs from such a relationship.

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