Science

A:

Adult humans are frequently shown successfully outrunning explosions in action movies, but the likelihood of this successfully happening in real life is extremely low depending on the conditions. The shockwaves, fire and other harmful products of an explosion travel outwards very fast in all directions, and unless a person is extremely alert, very fast and already pretty far away from the explosion's epicenter, they probably won't be able to outrun it.

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