Science

A:

As its name implies, hydrogen was first observed in water. Water consists of one oxygen atom bonded with two atoms of hydrogen. The abundance of water on Earth makes it the most common source of hydrogen on the planet. Pure hydrogen is rare on Earth, however, due to its propensity to react in the presence of oxygen and precipitate out as water vapor.

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    • What happens to stars as they age?

      Q: What happens to stars as they age?

      A: Stars on the main sequence that are the same size as the Sun begin as yellow stars and turn into red giants as their hydrogen fuel runs out. Other stars shrink or explode, depending on their size.
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    • What is outer space made of?

      Q: What is outer space made of?

      A: Outer space contains a low density of particles, primarily hydrogen gas, along with electromagnetic radiation. Many people, however, mistakenly believe outer space is a complete vacuum. The term "outer space" is used mainly to distinguish the space between planets from the planets and their airspace.
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    • What is the bright object in the western sky?

      Q: What is the bright object in the western sky?

      A: The planet Venus is the brightest object in the western sky. At its brightest, Venus is almost 10 times brighter than Jupiter, the sky's second brightest object.
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    • How does the Astrolabe work?

      Q: How does the Astrolabe work?

      A: Astrolabes work by presenting users with a graphic interface that makes it relatively easy to compute the positions of the sun, the moon and the stars. Astrolabes can be used for navigation as well as predicting the exact times for sunrise and sunset. Turned on its side, an astrolabe can be used as a mechanical calculator akin to a slide rule.
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    • Are stars bigger than the sun?

      Q: Are stars bigger than the sun?

      A: Stars exist that are both bigger and smaller than the sun. The sun has a radius of 1.4 million kilometers and, relative to other stars, is an average size.
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    • What color is the Milky Way?

      Q: What color is the Milky Way?

      A: In 2012, a team of astronomers from the University of Pittsburgh announced that the Milky Way galaxy is aptly named thanks to its pure, milky white color, which the scientists described as resembling a fresh snowfall. The fact that Earth is located within the Milky Way galaxy has made the process of measuring the galaxy's color difficult; obstructions from things like dust and gas within the galaxy had previously made it hard for scientists to get a broad enough view of the Milky Way in order to determine its color.
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    • What is an example of a saprophyte?

      Q: What is an example of a saprophyte?

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    • What is structural adaptation?

      Q: What is structural adaptation?

      A: Structural adaptations are the physical features of an organism that help it to survive and succeed in its environment. Structural adaptations can affect the way the creature moves, eats, reproduces or protects itself.
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    • What is the function of a synaptic knob?

      Q: What is the function of a synaptic knob?

      A: The function of a synaptic knob is to change the action potential that is carried by axons into a chemical message. The chemical message then interacts with the recipient neuron or effector. This process is called synaptic transmission.
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    • Why do animals need water?

      Q: Why do animals need water?

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    • How do viruses replicate?

      Q: How do viruses replicate?

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    • Why is chalk eating dangerous?

      Q: Why is chalk eating dangerous?

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      Q: Is methane gas harmful to humans?

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    • What is the concept of homeostasis?

      Q: What is the concept of homeostasis?

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    • What is the nickname for mercury?

      Q: What is the nickname for mercury?

      A: The nickname for the element mercury is "quicksilver." Mercury's atomic symbol, Hg, is derived from the Greek word "hydrargyrum," which means "liquid silver." It is the only metal that is a liquid at room temperature.
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    • Where can you find titanium?

      Q: Where can you find titanium?

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    • What are the charges of the noble gases?

      Q: What are the charges of the noble gases?

      A: The noble gases have neutral charges. Because these elements have full outer electron shells, they are resistant to bonding with other elements. Scientists long thought that these elements were completely inert.
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    • What is anomalous expansion of water?

      Q: What is anomalous expansion of water?

      A: The anomalous expansion of water is an abnormal property of water whereby it expands instead of contracting when the temperature goes from 4oC to 0oC, and it becomes less dense. The density becomes less and less as it freezes because molecules of water normally form open crystal structures when in solid form.
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    • What is refraction?

      Q: What is refraction?

      A: Refraction is the change in a wave's direction when it encounters a change in its transmission medium. The process of refraction allows eyes and lenses to form images. When the wave's medium changes, the velocity of the wave changes, but its frequency remains the same.
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    • How do you mix colors to make aqua?

      Q: How do you mix colors to make aqua?

      A: When working with watercolors or similar types of dye or paint, mixing primary colors allows painters to create specific shades not included in the paint kit. Mixing blue and green paint together creates any shade of aqua desired.
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    • What color does green and orange make?

      Q: What color does green and orange make?

      A: Green and orange make brown. Per Color Matters, green and orange are both secondary colors, meaning that they are made by mixing two primary colors. Mixing any two secondary colors yields a brown shade, from muddy brown to olive brown.
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    • What is the complementary color for gray?

      Q: What is the complementary color for gray?

      A: Gray is considered neutral and is complementary with any other color. Gray functions in a way that is similar to black and white when it comes to complementing other colors.
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    • What colors make burgundy?

      Q: What colors make burgundy?

      A: Burgundy, a deep reddish brown color named for Burgundy wine, is a mix of red, brown and a little bit of blue. The purple undertone of burgundy is created by the interaction between the red and the blue. Mixing any primary color with its complementary color creates brown.
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    • What two colors make orange?

      Q: What two colors make orange?

      A: Yellow and red combine to make orange. Orange is a secondary color while yellow and red are primary colors. All colors can be made from a combination of the three primary colors: yellow, red and blue.
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