Q:

How many minutes of daylight do we gain each day?

A:

Quick Answer

In the month of January, between 1.5 to 2 minutes of daylight are gained each day. In February, about 2 1/2 minutes of daylight are gained each day.

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How many minutes of daylight do we gain each day?
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Full Answer

The vernal equinox to the spring solstice is the period of time when the sun begins its assent from the lowest point in the southern sky. As the sky climbs, the amount of daylight exposure that the northern hemisphere of the earth receives each day rises. This is why the southern hemisphere experiences seasons in the opposite order to the northern hemisphere. This is also why much of the United States observes daylight savings time.

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