Q:

How long is a moon day?

A:

Quick Answer

According to NASA, one moon day is equal to 27 Earth days, which is the time the moon takes to complete its spin. The moon is tidally locked, so it always shows the same face to the Earth.

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How long is a moon day?
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Full Answer

The moon orbits the Earth at a distance of about 239,000 miles. It is rocky and has a solid surface. The craters and pits on the moon are a result of impacts. According to NASA, the surface features that create the face known as the “man in the moon” are the result of impact basins on the moon with dark basalt rocks.

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Related Questions

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    Does the moon spin?

    A:

    The moon does rotate, and it orbits around the Earth. It completes one full orbit around the Earth every 27.322 days. The moon also takes approximately 27 days to rotate around its own axis.

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  • Q:

    What are the different shapes of the moon called?

    A:

    The shapes of the moon over a 29.5 day period are known as its phases. They are the result of the moon being illuminated by the sun in different positions as it orbits the Earth.

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    How bright is the moon compared to the sun?

    A:

    Just as day is brighter than night, the sun is much brighter than the moon — 400,000 times brighter, to be exact. That's compared to even the fullest, brightest full moon. From an astronomical standpoint, this is no surprise. The moon doesn't generate its own light, and the burning sun provides the vast majority of all the natural light on earth.

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  • Q:

    Why are we able to see different phases of the moon?

    A:

    The moon orbits around the Earth on a 29 day cycle. Half of the moon is always lit by the sun's rays but different amounts of this illumination can be seen from Earth depending on the angle the moon makes with the sun relative to the Earth.

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