Q:

What are the four major landforms of Europe?

A:

Quick Answer

The four major landforms of Europe are the Western Uplands, North European Plain, Central Uplands and Alpine Mountains. These forms are all roughly arranged in bands that run from east to west.

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Full Answer

The Western Uplands, formed of hard, ancient rock shaped by glaciation, defines the north portion and west coastline of Europe, including Spain, French Brittany, the British Isles and Scandinavia. The low, fertile North European Plain is filled with navigable rivers and stretches from southern Britain through the heart of Europe to Russia. The Central Uplands are primarily wooded hills and highlands in France, Belgium, southern Germany and the Czech Republic, and the Alpine Mountains, marked with high peaks and a few active volcanoes, range from northern Spain across southern Europe to the Caucasus in Russia.

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    How are landforms formed?

    A:

    Landforms are formed by movements of the earth, such as earthquakes, weathering, erosions and deposits. Many landforms are created by more than one of these processes. These are called polygenetic landforms.

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  • Q:

    How are landforms made?

    A:

    Landforms are made by erosion, mineral deposits, earthquakes and other movements over the earth and weathering, according to The Encyclopedia of Earth. Landforms that are made by several processes are called polygenetic landforms.

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    What are all the different landforms?

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    How do volcanoes form landforms?

    A:

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