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What did Robert Hooke discover?

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Quick Answer

In the 17th century, the English physicist Robert Hooke discovered plant cells while examining cork under a microscope. He was the first to refer to the units as cells because their boxy appearance reminded him of monastery cells.

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Robert Hooke, the Curator of Experiments for the Royal Society, performed extensive work with microscopes. He is also famous for discovering the law of elasticity, known as Hooke's Law, and for his book Micrographia in which he details his observations while using the microscope. He included in the book remarkably complex and intricate drawings of those observations. In addition, he was Surveyor to the City of London, and he helped to design a number of the landmarks in London.

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  • Q:

    What did Robert Hooke invent?

    A:

    Robert Hooke has a number of inventions and patents to his credit. One of his most notable and useful inventions is the balance spring, which is a timepiece component that allows watches to remain accurate and remains widely used today.

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  • Q:

    What did Robert Hooke contribute to science?

    A:

    Robert Hooke made contributions across many fields of science, but his principal contribution was in the field of biology. Hooke published a book called "Micrographia" in which he detailed observations and experiments with light microscopes.

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  • Q:

    What scientific ideas did Robert Hooke have?

    A:

    Robert Hooke was a 17th century scientist who had scientific ideas about biological evolution and was attributed with investigating the expansion of matter. Hooke investigated a broad range of scientific subjects, including biology, geology, palaeontology and astronomy.

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  • Q:

    What discoveries did Matthias Schleiden make?

    A:

    Around 1838, Matthias Schleiden discovered that all plant tissues he examined with a microscope were composed of cells. He was the first to make a general statement about them, declaring that all parts of plants were composed of cells. Further, he said that plant embryos grew from single cells. He was also an early evolutionist, hypothesizing about the possibility of large-scale evolution over time in plants.

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