History

A:

The Cuban Missile Crisis was a 13-day dispute between Cuba and the Soviet Union on one side and the United States on the other. The event is regarded as the closest these world powers came to nuclear attacks during the Cold War. During this period, Fidel Castro was the leader of Cuba, Nikita Kruschev led the Soviet Union, and John F. Kennedy was president of the United States.

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    • Why Did Henry VIII Create the Church of England?

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