Q:

How many sons did Abraham have?

A:

Quick Answer

In total, Abraham had eight sons born to three different women. His firstborn was Ishmael, whose mother was an Egyptian slave girl, Hagar. Abraham's second son, Isaac, was delivered by his first wife Sarah, while he had another six sons with his second wife, Keturah.

Continue Reading
How many sons did Abraham have?
Credit: Nick Servian Robert Harding World Imagery Getty Images

Full Answer

There is some confusion as to how many sons Abraham had, as the Bible appears to contradict itself. In Galatians 4:22, it talks about Abraham having two sons, referring to Ishmael and Isaac. However, in Genesis 25:1-2, it mentions that Abraham remarried after his first wife Sarah had died. With his second wife Keturah, Abraham also had sons called Zimran, Jokshan, Medan, Midian, Ishbak and Shuah. These latter sons are not mentioned further because they are not central to Abraham's story.

Learn more about The Bible
Sources:

Related Questions

  • Q:

    Who wrote the Book of Psalms?

    A:

    King David, Moses, Heman the Ezrhaite, Ethan the Ezrhaite, King Solomon, Asaph and the sons of Korah are named as authors of many of the Psalms. Several of the Psalms are not attributed to a writer.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    How many children did King David have in the Bible?

    A:

    The Bible names 19 sons and one daughter belonging to King David, who had at least seven wives and many concubines. It is unknown exactly how many children King David fathered.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    Who are the patriarchs of the Old Testament?

    A:

    According to Oxford Biblical Studies, the patriarchs of the Old Testament were Abraham, Isaac and Jacob. Between them, these three men are figurative fathers of the Israelite nation.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    Who is St. Sarah?

    A:

    St. Sarah is traditionally identified with the Sarah of the Hebrew scriptures, the wife of Abraham, as described in the Book of Genesis. A second "St. Sarah" is identified in the medieval legend that has Mary Jacobe, Mary Salome, and Mary Magdalene arriving in southern France after the crucifixion of Christ accompanied by a black Egyptian servant named Sarah.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:

Explore