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What are some different types of behavior?

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Quick Answer

Phil for Humanity states that there are three types of behavior patterns people exhibit when interacting with others: passive, aggressive and assertive. Ron Kurtus' School for Champions describes emotional behavior, bad behavior, uncontrolled behavior and group behavior as commonly studied behavior types. Bad behavior is also referred to as antisocial behavior, as these are actions that deliberately defy rules, both rules established by culture and society as well as law.

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According to Phil for Humanity, passive behavior is characterized as nonconfrontational and respectful without demanding reciprocity. Passive people use vague language and have low self-esteem. Their behavior is an attempt to maintain a harmonious relationship with others. Another possible motive of passive behavior is a desire to remain free of responsibility. Aggressive behavior is the opposite; these people require respectful treatment without giving it in turn. The end goal of their actions is to further their own agenda or win. Assertiveness is depicted as a more socially acceptable and healthier behavior pattern. Assertive people are truthful with high self-esteem. They value others and have empathy and compassion for them. Additionally, respect is completely reciprocal. As a consequence, their interactions tend to be comparatively devoid of serious conflict.

Ron Kurtus' School for Champions defines emotional behavior as actions that stem from and are direct reactions to the feelings of fear, excitement, joy, sorrow or anger. The reactions can be instinctual or learned. Uncontrolled behavior is often symptomatic of an addiction but can also have an emotional basis. These behaviors cannot be stopped or directed by the person displaying them. Group behavior is the result of being collective and functioning as a singular entity.

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