Q:

What is the definition of feminist criticism?

A:

Quick Answer

Feminist criticism is a literary form of criticism that gives the perspective of writing through a feminist perspective. It is a political form of literature that analyzes the questions of how male and females relate to each other and the world, the repression of women and how women are portrayed in literature.

Continue Reading
What is the definition of feminist criticism?
Credit: valentina angiuli photografie Moment Getty Images

Full Answer

Feminist criticism gives credit to Virginia Woolf’s “A Room of One’s Own” analyzation of circumstances unique to women writers as the beginning of feminist criticism. One of the first examples of a major feminist literary analysis is the focus of Petruchio’s treatment of Katharina in William Shakespeare’s “The Taming of the Shrew” in the late 1960s. The feminist criticism school entitled Gynocriticism followed in the late 1970s to solidify the existence of feminist criticism.

Gynocriticism proposes that women writers have gone through stages of existence that can be broken down into three segments: the feminine phase, the feminist phase and the female phase. Each stage of Gynocriticism shows the evolution of the mindset of women writers; the first stage purports that writers at first tried to maintain the values of the male writer, but no longer bothered to maintain or concern themselves with the set standards once the last stage was reached.

Learn more about Social Sciences

Related Questions

  • Q:

    What is social constructionist approach?

    A:

    A social constructionist approach is the perspective that many of the characteristics and groups that shape society are inventions of the people living within it in order to create a hierarchy. Race, sexual orientation, class, gender and even mental illness are just a few examples of things that have been postulated to be social constructs and do not exist in reality. In essence, society is a conglomeration of perspectives.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    What are some examples of how to formulate sociological research questions?

    A:

    A sociological question should start with your topic of interest that examines a subject from a sociological perspective, how groups and individuals interact. Sociologists approach questions with the goal of finding deeper meaning in social patterns and group dynamics.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    Give examples of sociological imagination?

    A:

    One example of sociological imagination is for a person to imagine he is living several hundred years earlier, and how that changes his perspective about present-day life. Another example is for a person to imagine he lives in a poor country where Western conveniences and comforts don't exist.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    What are the three sociological perspectives?

    A:

    The three sociological perspectives that most modern sociologists use are the symbolic interactionist perspective, the functionalist perspective and the conflict perspective. These perspectives conceptualize society, social forces and human behavior to offer sociologists paradigms of how society influences people, and how people influence society.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:

Explore