Q:

What are the predators of bald eagles?

A:

Quick Answer

Outside of human beings, bald eagles have very few natural enemies, and adult eagles have no natural predators. Nestlings and eggs are occasionally preyed on by gulls, crows, hawks, owls, other eagles, bobcats, black bears and raccoons.

Continue Reading
What are the predators of bald eagles?
Credit: adam w CC-BY 2.0

Full Answer

Since eagle nests are frequently high up in trees and very large, carnivores that are poor climbers rarely have access to the eggs and young, and bald eagles are attentive enough parents to protect their young from harm in most cases. Poor access to food can leave the young vulnerable, however, as parents must hunt longer and farther from the nest to provide for their offspring.

Learn more about Eagles

Related Questions

  • Q:

    What do golden eagles eat?

    A:

    Golden eagles are opportunistic predators and eat many kinds of animals, but mainly eat small mammals such as rabbits, hares and ground squirrels, as well as various types of birds. They also feed on ungulates such as sheep and goats, small carnivores such as foxes, and reptiles.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    What eats bald eagles?

    A:

    Adult bald eagles sit at the top of the food chain and have no natural predators. Bald eagle eggs, on the other hand, can become damaged by animals such as raccoons and crows, which can expose the eggs to bacteria and prevent them from hatching. Humans are the primary unnatural predators of bald eagles and pose more of a risk to them than anything else on Earth.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    What are the enemies of spider monkeys?

    A:

    According to the University of Michigan, the enemies, or predators, of spider monkeys are jaguars, pumas, ocelots, margays and harpy eagles. The biggest threat to this animal, however, is humans.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    How did the bald eagle become endangered?

    A:

    There are several reasons that bald eagles became an endangered species including habitat destruction, hunting, competition with humans for food and exposure to chemical pesticides. The decline of the bald eagle began with European settlement of North America and was made worse by westward expansion.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:

Explore