Q:

How many shrimp equals 3 ounces?

A:

Quick Answer

The weight of shrimp varies substantially, so the number of shrimp in a 3-ounce quantity can vary. Shrimp are sold by count, indicating how many shrimp equal 1 pound in weight. For example, "jumbo" shrimp may be 16 count, meaning each weighs 1 ounce.

Continue Reading

Full Answer

"Large" shrimp are usually 31/40 count, which means 31 to 40 shrimp make up 1 pound. This means there are around two or three shrimp per ounce in weight, which would mean six to nine shrimp in a 3-ounce serving. In addition, shrimp lose some weight when peeled and cooked, so nine or more cooked, large shrimp may be needed to make up a 3-ounce serving.

Learn more about Marine Life

Related Questions

  • Q:

    What eats shrimp?

    A:

    Shrimp are eaten by both Atlantic and Pacific cod, American herring, basking and whale sharks. They are also eaten by croakers, thornbacks, southern stingrays, southern flounders and Greenland halibut. Shrimp are eaten by people as well, who capture more than 3 million tons of the sea food each year.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    How do you build a shrimp trap?

    A:

    One way to make a simple shrimp trap is to weave a capped funnel from sticks, bark and vines. These traps are also useful for catching fish and turtles. This one-hour project requires seven 6-foot saplings, several shorter saplings, willow bark strips, grapevines, a 12-foot pole, a bait ball and a utility knife.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    How big is the world's largest shrimp?

    A:

    The world's largest shrimp can grow to nearly 16 inches long. It is the zebra mantis shrimp, or the striped mantis shrimp. These shrimp live in the bottoms of reefs in the Indian and Pacific Oceans from Hawaii to East Africa and off the Galapagos Islands.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    How do shrimp swim?

    A:

    Shrimp swim by pulling their abdomen in toward their body quickly, states the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission. The movement allows them to propel their body through the water, but because of their body's configuration, the motion causes them to swim backward. When done rapidly, it's also called lobstering.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:

Explore