Q:

How many killer whales are left in the world?

A:

Quick Answer

Although the exact number of killer whales in the oceans is unknown, as of 2014, scientists estimate that the population is at least 50,000 individuals. Other studies suggest that killer whale populations reach into the hundreds of thousands.

Continue Reading

Full Answer

Killer whales, also known as orcas, live in all of the world's oceans, but they are primarily found in colder waters. They are intelligent mammals and are very social animals that travel in groups, called pods, ranging between 5 and 30 individuals. Pods are dominated by females, and the members of the pod work together to catch food. Killer whales are known to beach themselves in order to scare penguins and seals into the water where other group members are waiting to feed.

Learn more about Marine Mammals

Related Questions

  • Q:

    How long do killer whales live?

    A:

    Life expectancy of killer whales in the Pacific Northwest is approximately 30 to 50 years for females and 19 to 30 years for males. However, the relatively long life of killer whales makes it difficult to accurately estimate their typical life expectancy.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    Do killer whales eat polar bears?

    A:

    Generally, killer whales will not eat polar bears, but because they can be opportunistic eaters, if a polar bear presents itself as food the whale may eat it. However, the two animals typically leave each other alone.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    What is the size of a killer whale?

    A:

    According to Defenders of Wildlife, male killer whales grow up to 23 feet in length and weigh from 7 to 10 tons. Female whales grow up to 23 feet when fully grown and weigh anywhere from 4 to 6 tons.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    What does a killer whale eat?

    A:

    Killer whales eat a wide range of large animals, including seals, sea lions, smaller whales, bony fish, sharks, cephalopods, sea turtles and otters. They are the apex predators of the oceans, swallowing smaller prey whole and tearing larger prey apart while facing no natural predators of their own.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:

Explore