Q:

What is a baby leopard called?

A:

Quick Answer

A baby leopard is called a cub. Cubs stay with their litter mates and mother until they are about two years old, at which time they begin living on their own.

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What is a baby leopard called?
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Full Answer

Leopard cubs weigh only 1 pound at birth and open their eyes around 10 days later. They rely on their mother, who is called a leopardess, for everything. Leopardesses give birth to two to six cubs at a time. A male leopard is simply referred to as a leopard. A group of leopards is called a "leap" or a "prowl." Sometimes a leopard group is referred to as a "spot."

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Related Questions

  • Q:

    What is a leopard's habitat?

    A:

    The habitat of a leopard is found in semi-deserts, savannas, grasslands and rainforests. Leopards live in Sub-Saharan Africa, parts of the Middle East and southern and central Asia, particularly in India and China.

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  • Q:

    What is the difference between a cheetah and a leopard?

    A:

    Some differences between a cheetah and a leopard include their sizes, shapes and spots. Although the leopard and the cheetah are about the same height, the leopard can weigh nearly 30 pounds more than the cheetah.

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  • Q:

    What animal eats a leopard?

    A:

    A crocodile may prey on a leopard if given the opportunity. Other large, land-based predators such as lions and hyenas are known to hunt and kill leopards, although this is mostly due to territorial dispute. While leopards are well-equipped to defend themselves, they mostly avoid confrontation with these predators.

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  • Q:

    What eats the Amur leopard?

    A:

    Amur leopards have no natural predators, but humans have hunted them extensively for their furs. One of the most endangered animals on the planet, scientists estimate that there are fewer than 50 individuals living in the wild. Habitat destruction, lack of ample prey and human hunting are the factors that have led to the large cats’ demise.

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