Q:

What kind of doctor treats a hernia?

A:

Quick Answer

A hernia is typically diagnosed by a general practitioner, who can recommend surgery. The surgery to repair the hernia is performed by a general surgeon.

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Full Answer

A hernia occurs whenever an internal organ protrudes through an abnormal part of the body. A hernia most commonly occurs when a portion of the intestines pushes through the abdominal wall. Once a doctor determines that symptoms indicate a hernia, that doctor schedules a consultation with a surgeon for the patient. The surgeon then determines the best surgical course of action. If the hernia exists close to the bladder or uretha, a urologist may consult on the case.

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