Geography

A:

Cardinal directions refer to four points on a compass: north, south, east and west. Each cardinal direction is separated from another by 90 degrees out of a 360-degree circle on a compass. North is at the top, east is to the right, south points towards the bottom and west is to the left.

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      Q: Does It Snow in Africa?

      A: While many assume that Africa as mainly desert, it is a diverse continent that sees a fair amount of snowfall away from the countries near the equator. Snowfall in Africa is rare, occurring in mountainous regions and in isolated incidences.
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    • What Is the Population of West Africa?

      Q: What Is the Population of West Africa?

      A: The countries of West Africa have a population of 245 million. According to the World Bank, 65 percent of the population are living in rural areas.
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      Q: How Do You Navigate in the Desert?

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      Q: What Is the Capital of Guinea?

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    • Which Wild Animal Kills the Most Humans in Africa?

      Q: Which Wild Animal Kills the Most Humans in Africa?

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    • Why Is the Niger River Important to Africa?

      Q: Why Is the Niger River Important to Africa?

      A: The Niger is an important river in Africa because it is the principal river in Western Africa and provides an invaluable water source in the Sahara Desert. It’s two fertile deltas provide critical water sources and wetlands to an otherwise very dry region.
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    • What Kind of Animals Live in Antarctica?

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    • How Can We Protect Antarctica?

      Q: How Can We Protect Antarctica?

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    • Which Animals Live in the Polar Regions?

      Q: Which Animals Live in the Polar Regions?

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    • What Animals Live at the North Pole?

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    • What Is the Lowest Point in Asia?

      Q: What Is the Lowest Point in Asia?

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    • How Did Asia Get Its Name?

      Q: How Did Asia Get Its Name?

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    • What Are Some Facts About the Capital of South Korea?

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      Q: What Is the Largest Desert in Asia?

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    • What Is the Latitude and Longitude of Australia?

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    • Does It Snow in Australia?

      Q: Does It Snow in Australia?

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