Q:

What was Plato's theory of ethics?

A:

Quick Answer

Plato's theory of ethics, known as the Theory of Forms, stipulates that a person's well-being aims for the highest level of morality, but a person's virtues provide the skills necessary to attain a desired level of morality. Plato's theory of ethics deems happiness as the ultimate level of perfection.

Continue Reading
What was Plato's theory of ethics?
Credit: Olivia Bell Photography Moment Getty Images

Full Answer

The Theory of Forms is based on the belief that good is the highest form. Plato's theory of ethics evolved over time as he worked with his mentor, Socrates. In his works, Plato argues that a person's soul determines the state of the person's happiness, thus indicating that a good soul indicates a good life.

Learn more about Religion

Related Questions

  • Q:

    What is the Maslow Hierarchy of Needs?

    A:

    The Maslow Hierarchy of Needs is a theory proposed by psychologist Abraham Maslow in his 1943 paper "A Theory of Human Motivation." It is a construct that expresses a pattern of needs that must be fulfilled in order for people to live fulfilled lives. The hierarchy has five ordered levels composed of physiological needs at the bottom, then safety needs, belongingness and love needs, esteem needs and the need for self-actualization.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    How do you define "pre-conventional morality?"

    A:

    Pre-conventional morality is the first level of Lawrence Kohlberg's theory of moral development in which people first comprehend fixed rules as behavioral guidelines and then grow to understand that everyone has a unique position in choosing to obey or not obey them. Pre-conventional morality, or the first level of morality, is subdivided into two stages. There are two other levels of the morality theory respectively called conventional and post-conventional morality.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    What are Kohlberg's stages of adolescent moral development?

    A:

    Building on Piaget's theory of moral development, Lawrence Kohlberg established three levels of moral development, including pre-conventional morality, conventional morality and post-conventional morality, explains SimplyPsychology.org. Each level has two stages, with obedience and punishment orientation at one end of the spectrum and universal principles at the other.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:
  • Q:

    What is Karl Marx's theory of social change?

    A:

    Karl Marx's theory of social change relates to the class struggle that defined the 19th century, namely that of the ruling classes (the bourgeoisie) suppressing the working classes (the proletariat), and as a result Marx's theory of social change stated that economic needs should be pursued purely on the basis of need while providing general well-being for all. This theory is and was at odds with capitalism, which, according to Marx, only helped fuel class divisions.

    Full Answer >
    Filed Under:

Explore