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What is the general idea behind baptism in The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints?

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Quick Answer

Members of The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints believe that God requires baptism in order for followers to enter heaven. Baptism is a symbol of the washing away of sins and a promise to live as a Christian. Because of Jesus Christ's baptism, members of the church believe in its necessity.

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Full Answer

Baptism in The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints involves immersion, which means that a church official lowers the individual into water and raises him back up during the baptism. This is a symbol of the death, burial and resurrection of Jesus Christ, and it also represents a spiritual rebirth of the baptized person. The church sees baptism as the person's promise to God to live as a Christian and keep God's commandments. A member of the church who has the appropriate authority performs baptisms.

Because it considers baptism to be an important promise, The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints does not baptize babies, as they are not old enough to make decisions and promises. The church baptizes children when they are 8 years old. The church believes that younger children are too young to understand God's commandments and considers them saved without baptism.

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