Psychology

A:

The biggest emphasis of Gestalt psychology is that when it comes to perception, the whole picture is greater than the sum of the parts from which it's made. Gestalt psychologists believe that to properly interpret what is seen, heard, tasted, touched or smelled, the mind organizes the perception into groups so that whatever is being sensed can be interpreted without unnecessary repetition.

See Full Answer
Filed Under:
  • What are conceptual skills?

    Q: What are conceptual skills?

    A: Conceptual skills are skills that allow a person to think creatively while also understanding abstract ideas and complicated processes. A person who has conceptual skills will be able to solve problems, formulate processes and understand the relationship between ideas, concepts, patterns and symbols.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • What are the different kinds of listening?

    Q: What are the different kinds of listening?

    A: The five different types of listening are informative, relationship, appreciative, critical and discriminative, states Air University, which provides U.S. Air Force education at Maxwell Air Force Base. The purpose of these listening types is to make communication more effective.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • What is typical immature behavior?

    Q: What is typical immature behavior?

    A: Typical immature behavior in children, teens and adults is conduct that tends to portray an individual as younger than his or her true age. Characteristics may include chronically making self-centered choices, inability to think and reason independently, demanding a great deal of attention and exhibiting "baby" traits, such as crying and pouting.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • What is emotional development?

    Q: What is emotional development?

    A: Emotional development refers to a child's growing ability to regulate and control emotions and to form secure relationships. It differs from cognitive development, which readies a child for school, in that it prepares a child to take on a greater degree of responsibility for his or her internal state. Growing scientific evidence shows that a child's experiences during the early years play a significant role in emotional development.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • What is it called when you believe your own lies?

    Q: What is it called when you believe your own lies?

    A: According to a scholarly article in the Journal of the American Academy of Psychiatry and the Law, there is some indication that pathological liars believe their own lies to the extent of delusion. The claim remains controversial among psychiatrists. Pathological lying is also called mythomania or pseudologia fantastica.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • Why is deviance considered social construction?

    Q: Why is deviance considered social construction?

    A: Deviance is considered a social construct because it is defined strictly by what a particular society defines as normal. What is deviant in one society is not necessarily deviant in another.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • What is framing in psychology?

    Q: What is framing in psychology?

    A: Psychological framing defines an idea, issue or reality based upon context. The concept of framing disputes the theory of rational choice. The experiments of the researchers Tversky and Khneman in 1981 suggest that the way a decision is presented has a large impact upon the choices that result.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • What is the stability versus change debate in psychology?

    Q: What is the stability versus change debate in psychology?

    A: The debate in psychology over stability versus change centers on the permanence of initial personality traits. Some developmental psychologists argue that personality traits seen in infancy persist through a person's entire life, while others disagree.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • Why do people hum?

    Q: Why do people hum?

    A: People hum for several reasons, such as to calm nerves, feel happier and reduce stress. People hum unconsciously and consciously. Many use humming as a simple and effective way to ease tension and reduce stress and often derive health benefits in the form of improved sinus health in the process.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • What does the McGurk Effect illustrate?

    Q: What does the McGurk Effect illustrate?

    A: According to io9, The McGurk Effect illustrates how it is possible for the brain to hear the wrong sound if it is shown visual evidence that something else is being said. The effect is named after Harry McGurk from a paper he wrote entitled "Hearing Lips and Seeing Voices."
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • What is social play for children?

    Q: What is social play for children?

    A: During social play, children progress through social stages by interacting with other children in recreational and learning activities. The goal of social play is to progress toward and master cooperative play. Children first observe other children then play alone before moving to the stages involving parallel and cooperative play.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • What is a flashbulb memory?

    Q: What is a flashbulb memory?

    A: A flashbulb memory is a vivid and concrete memory that is created in the brain when a person experiences or learns of emotional, shocking events. People tend to remember very specific details of flashbulb memories.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • What is psychodynamic psychology?

    Q: What is psychodynamic psychology?

    A: The psychodynamic approach to psychology does not use the usual scientific routes of explanation, instead it focuses on the individual's thoughts on experiences, how they see the world and their relationships. Psychologist Sigmund Freud is considered to be the founder of the psychodynamic approach.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • What are the types of humor?

    Q: What are the types of humor?

    A: According to Psychology Today, different types of humor include put-down humor, bonding humor and hate-me humor. These terms are used to describe aggressive humor that satirizes a person's unique quirks, warm humor that is clean and good-natured, and self-deprecating humor in which the joker makes fun of himself. Laughing at life is another form of humor that pokes fun at the general silliness of life.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • What is synchrony in child development?

    Q: What is synchrony in child development?

    A: The technical definition of synchrony is "a co-ordinated interaction between caregiver and infant, who respond to each other with split-second timing." The caregiver, whether it is mother or father, can react to a baby's emotion instinctively. The baby feels the connection between facial expressions and emotions and synchrony between caregiver and child is achieved.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • What is social interaction?

    Q: What is social interaction?

    A: At its essence, social interaction is defined as the manner in which people talk to and interact with one another. Social interaction is dependent upon the societal structure in which the communications occur.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • What is a fixed-ratio schedule?

    Q: What is a fixed-ratio schedule?

    A: A fixed-ratio schedule is a schedule of reinforcement where a response is only reinforced upon a specified number of responses. Generally, it is a rule indicating behavior instances to be reinforced. This schedule yields a high, stable responding rate with only a brief break after the enforcer’s delivery.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • What is charismatic leadership?

    Q: What is charismatic leadership?

    A: Charismatic leadership is the process of encouraging certain behaviors in others via force of personality, persuasion and eloquent communication. Charismatic leaders inspire their followers to do things or to do things better; this is done by conjuring up enthusiasm in others for a stated vision or goal.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • What is the meaning of physical needs?

    Q: What is the meaning of physical needs?

    A: Physical needs are the absolute basic necessities that a person needs to survive. These needs include things such as water, food, air, shelter and clothing.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • What is an absolute threshold in psychology?

    Q: What is an absolute threshold in psychology?

    A: In psychology, absolute threshold is the smallest amount of intensity from a stimulus that is detected by a person's senses. These senses include vision, hearing, taste, touch and smell.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under:
  • What is the difference between id and ego?

    Q: What is the difference between id and ego?

    A: The id includes primitive and instinctive behaviors, whereas the ego is the part of personality concerned with reality. Id and ego are two of the three elements of personality proposed by Sigmund Freud.
    See Full Answer
    Filed Under: