Psychology

A:

The biggest emphasis of Gestalt psychology is that when it comes to perception, the whole picture is greater than the sum of the parts from which it's made. Gestalt psychologists believe that to properly interpret what is seen, heard, tasted, touched or smelled, the mind organizes the perception into groups so that whatever is being sensed can be interpreted without unnecessary repetition.

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  • What Are Erik Erikson's Stages of Psychosocial Development?

    Q: What Are Erik Erikson's Stages of Psychosocial Development?

    A: Erik Erikson's eight stages of psychosocial development, first published in the 1950s, include trust versus mistrust, autonomy versus doubt, initiative versus guilt, competence versus inferiority, identity versus role confusion, intimacy versus isolation, generativity versus stagnation, and integrity versus despair. These stages begin at birth and continue until advanced age and death. Five stages occur before the age of 18.
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  • What Is a Type B Personality?

    Q: What Is a Type B Personality?

    A: In contemporary personality theories, a "Type B personality" means someone is generally laid back and steady in performance. The "Type B" is often simply viewed as a counter to the popular "Type A personality," which describes a person who is intense and accomplishment-driven.
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  • What Is Effective Listening?

    Q: What Is Effective Listening?

    A: Effective listening requires that communication is heard completely and effectively interpreted into meaningful messages. It requires knowledge of the subject being discussed and attention to the speaker. Good effective listening skills demand that a person hears the message in full so that an applicable interpretation of the data is feasible.
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  • How Long Does It Take to Create a Habit?

    Q: How Long Does It Take to Create a Habit?

    A: Creating a new habit can take anywhere between 18 and 254 days. Based on a study conducted by Phillippa Lally, a health psychology researcher at University College London, published in the European Journal of Social Psychology, it takes two to eight months before a person can form a habit and automatically do something. Forming a new habit depends on the person, his behavior and his circumstances.
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  • What Are the Different Kinds of Listening?

    Q: What Are the Different Kinds of Listening?

    A: The five different types of listening are informative, relationship, appreciative, critical and discriminative, states Air University, which provides U.S. Air Force education at Maxwell Air Force Base. The purpose of these listening types is to make communication more effective.
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  • What Are Levinson's Theories on Adulthood?

    Q: What Are Levinson's Theories on Adulthood?

    A: The Adult Development website explains that Daniel Levinson's theory on adulthood includes the idea of three stages of adulthood occurring in a person's life after adolescence. These stages are known as early, middle and late adulthood.
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  • What Is the Meaning of Physical Needs?

    Q: What Is the Meaning of Physical Needs?

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  • Why Is Courage Important?

    Q: Why Is Courage Important?

    A: Courage is important because it allows people to develop a sense of leadership and confidence and provides benefits for businesses, through fearless, more productive employees. Courage is regarded as an admirable personal trait, providing benefits for people personally, socially and professionally. Courage is one of the most valued and admired traits among business leaders and is a key characteristic of many leaders.
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  • Why Is Science Important?

    Q: Why Is Science Important?

    A: Almost everything in the modern world revolves around science. It is part of daily activities, including cooking, gardening, understanding a weather report, reading a map and using a computer. Science is the knowledge of the natural and physical elements in the world. Nutritional choices are science because the process involves choosing products with least impact on the environment, or making informed choices about one’s health care.
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  • What Is the Difference Between Id and Ego?

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  • What Does the McGurk Effect Illustrate?

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  • What Is a Physical Need?

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  • What Is Irreversibility in Psychology?

    Q: What Is Irreversibility in Psychology?

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  • What's the Average Person's Attention Span?

    Q: What's the Average Person's Attention Span?

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  • What Is a Fixed-Ratio Schedule?

    Q: What Is a Fixed-Ratio Schedule?

    A: A fixed-ratio schedule is a schedule of reinforcement where a response is only reinforced upon a specified number of responses. Generally, it is a rule indicating behavior instances to be reinforced. This schedule yields a high, stable responding rate with only a brief break after the enforcer’s delivery.
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  • Who Was Henry Goddard?

    Q: Who Was Henry Goddard?

    A: Henry Goddard was a psychologist who was an advocate for intelligence testing and introduced the Binet Intelligence Test to the United States in 1908. While his research led to the development of special education programs for the mentally disabled and the concept of diminished capacity in legal trials, it also fueled the eugenics and scientific racism movements.
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  • What Is Qualitative Analysis Used For?

    Q: What Is Qualitative Analysis Used For?

    A: Qualitative analysis is used in chemistry in order to determine which chemical elements, either single or grouped, are present in a given sample of material. Qualitative analysis is typically performed using a mass spectrometer or chromatography.
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  • What Is Piaget's Theory of Moral Development?

    Q: What Is Piaget's Theory of Moral Development?

    A: Piaget's theory of moral development describes how children transition from doing right because of the consequences of an authority figure to making right choices due to ideal reciprocity or what is best for the other person. Piaget ties moral development to cognitive development. Piaget published his work in the 1920s, though it took several decades to become prominent.
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  • What Are the Factors That Affect Students' Academic Achievement?

    Q: What Are the Factors That Affect Students' Academic Achievement?

    A: Academic achievement can be influenced by a variety of factors, from simple demographic factors, such as age, gender and family socioeconomic status to more variable factors like the quality of the teaching faculty at a student's school and the way that students with special needs are grouped together. For example, in some cases, students of a certain gender or race may have a statistically better chance of academic success than their peers of a different gender or race. Additionally, home life, including parental financial status and the amount of support and stability offered at home, can have a big impact on how students perform in school.
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  • What Is Hypnosis?

    Q: What Is Hypnosis?

    A: Hypnosis is a process that results in a person being in a trance-like state of highly focused attention. This is often used in stage shows to get people to do ridiculous things, but it also has therapeutic benefits such as reducing pain.
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  • Why Is the Study of Psychology Important?

    Q: Why Is the Study of Psychology Important?

    A: According to Ronald Riggio, Ph.D., of Claremont McKenna College, the study of psychology is important to explain basic human behavior, apply critical decision and thinking skills, improve interpersonal communication and provide a background for the business sector. Psychology graduates hold many different careers.
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