Psychology

A:

There is evidence to suggest that comedy is a skill that can be gained or honed through practice; doing things like taking classes or studying advice from famous comedians may help a person become more humorous. It may be possible to find a professional stand-up or improv comic who teaches workshops or clinics on comedy, allowing individuals to hone their skills in a group setting through hands-on learning. Additionally, books on the subject are available for those who want additional information or prefer to study on their own.

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  • What is a person that has a phobia for germs called?

    Q: What is a person that has a phobia for germs called?

    A: While people with a fear of germs are commonly referred to as germaphobes, mysophobia is actually the official medical term for this condition. Mysophobia is commonly found in individuals diagnosed with an anxiety disorder known as obsessive-compulsive disorder.
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  • How do you learn to be funny?

    Q: How do you learn to be funny?

    A: There is evidence to suggest that comedy is a skill that can be gained or honed through practice; doing things like taking classes or studying advice from famous comedians may help a person become more humorous. It may be possible to find a professional stand-up or improv comic who teaches workshops or clinics on comedy, allowing individuals to hone their skills in a group setting through hands-on learning. Additionally, books on the subject are available for those who want additional information or prefer to study on their own.
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  • What is effective communication?

    Q: What is effective communication?

    A: Effective communication is communication that is clearly and successfully delivered, received and understood. Learning the skills of effective communication can help people to resolve differences while building trust and respect.
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  • What is a fixed-ratio schedule?

    Q: What is a fixed-ratio schedule?

    A: A fixed-ratio schedule is a schedule of reinforcement where a response is only reinforced upon a specified number of responses. Generally, it is a rule indicating behavior instances to be reinforced. This schedule yields a high, stable responding rate with only a brief break after the enforcer’s delivery.
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  • How long does it take to create a habit?

    Q: How long does it take to create a habit?

    A: Creating a new habit can take anywhere between 18 and 254 days. Based on a study conducted by Phillippa Lally, a health psychology researcher at University College London, published in the European Journal of Social Psychology, it takes two to eight months before a person can form a habit and automatically do something. Forming a new habit depends on the person, his behavior and his circumstances.
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  • What is the difference between nature and nurture?

    Q: What is the difference between nature and nurture?

    A: Nature refers to traits and characteristics that are inherited or genetic in origin, while nurture refers to traits and qualities that are learned by organisms as they grow. The terms "nature" and "nurture" consist of many different subcategories in the field of psychology. These categories fall under several different approaches and theories, which work together to describe the complex characteristics of humans and animals.
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  • What are negative and positive incentives?

    Q: What are negative and positive incentives?

    A: Positive incentives seek to motivate others by promising a reward, whereas negative incentives aim to motivate others by threatening a punishment. Opinion is divided as to what works best, but both have applications in a variety of settings.
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  • What is irreversibility in psychology?

    Q: What is irreversibility in psychology?

    A: Irreversibility is one of the characteristics of behaviorist Jean Piaget's preoperational stage of his theory of child development. It refers to the inability of the child at this stage to understand that actions, when done, can be undone to return to the original state. Thus, the child cannot use this understanding to solve problems.
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  • What is "team identity"?

    Q: What is "team identity"?

    A: Team identity refers to the phenomena of individual team members who feel a positive attitude towards, and identify with, their team. When team members achieve team identity, they put the needs of the team before their own.
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  • What are the steps of grief?

    Q: What are the steps of grief?

    A: The stages of grief are denial, anger, bargaining, depression and acceptance. The stages may not occur in order, and the stages can last for months or years after the loss.
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  • What does the McGurk Effect illustrate?

    Q: What does the McGurk Effect illustrate?

    A: According to io9, The McGurk Effect illustrates how it is possible for the brain to hear the wrong sound if it is shown visual evidence that something else is being said. The effect is named after Harry McGurk from a paper he wrote entitled "Hearing Lips and Seeing Voices."
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  • Does listening to music actually make you smarter?

    Q: Does listening to music actually make you smarter?

    A: While you may commend Baby Einstein for making you into the genius you are, you're the one who deserves all the credit. There's no science to fully back up the claim that listening to music makes you smarter.
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  • What does it mean if someone laughs in their sleep?

    Q: What does it mean if someone laughs in their sleep?

    A: Sleep laughing is a common phenomenon known as hypnogely. Hypnogely indicates a mild disruption in sleep patterns during the REM state of sleep, but it is generally harmless.
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  • What is a Type B personality?

    Q: What is a Type B personality?

    A: In contemporary personality theories, a "Type B personality" means someone is generally laid back and steady in performance. The "Type B" is often simply viewed as a counter to the popular "Type A personality," which describes a person who is intense and accomplishment-driven.
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  • What percentage of an average human's life is spent sleeping?

    Q: What percentage of an average human's life is spent sleeping?

    A: According to Phys.org, an average person sleeps for one-third of his life. Because of sleep, about 318 months in an average person’s life is spent lying in bed, based on the average life expectancy of 79.5 years, according to The Fact Site.
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  • What is a flashbulb memory?

    Q: What is a flashbulb memory?

    A: A flashbulb memory is a vivid and concrete memory that is created in the brain when a person experiences or learns of emotional, shocking events. People tend to remember very specific details of flashbulb memories.
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  • What is the Machiavellian theory?

    Q: What is the Machiavellian theory?

    A: The Machiavellian theory, or the Machiavellian intelligence theory, is a social theory that hypothesizes that the increase in brain size during human evolution from primates occurred due to humans working in groups. This group work in turn causes humans and primates to think about complex issues and relationships.
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  • What is formal and informal observation?

    Q: What is formal and informal observation?

    A: Formal observation refers to the precise, highly controlled methods that take place in a laboratory setting, while informal observation is a more casual observation of the surrounding environment. Anthropologists and others in the soft sciences often make use of informal observation, while hard sciences generally require more stringent methods of empirical assessment.
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  • Does music effect people's behavior?

    Q: Does music effect people's behavior?

    A: According to the findings of a wide number of studies, human beings respond to music on a neurological level, to the extent that some medical researchers believe it is capable of eventually helping those who suffer from the effects of a stroke or other condition to recover. However, neuroscientists and psychologists continue to attempt to pinpoint exactly how music affects the brain.
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  • What is the stability versus change debate in psychology?

    Q: What is the stability versus change debate in psychology?

    A: The debate in psychology over stability versus change centers on the permanence of initial personality traits. Some developmental psychologists argue that personality traits seen in infancy persist through a person's entire life, while others disagree.
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  • Why do people need communication?

    Q: Why do people need communication?

    A: Communication is the basis of human interaction and refers to the act of transferring information from one person to another. Communication has multiple forms, and it is one of the most important skills people acquire in life.
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