Philosophy

A:

An ethical issue brings systems of morality and principles into conflict. Unlike most conflicts that can be disputed with facts and objective truths, ethical issues are more subjective and open to opinions and interpretation.

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  • What are Plato's four cardinal virtues?

    Q: What are Plato's four cardinal virtues?

    A: Plato's four cardinal virtues are prudence, justice, temperance and courage. These virtues are also often translated as wisdom, fairness, restraint (also called moderation) and fortitude.
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  • What are the four goals of Progressivism?

    Q: What are the four goals of Progressivism?

    A: The four goals of Progressivism are to protect social welfare, encourage productiveness, uphold moral values, and generate economic reform. The Progressive movement intended to accomplish these goals by eliminating differences among citizens.
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  • What did Socrates contribute to philosophy?

    Q: What did Socrates contribute to philosophy?

    A: Socrates contributed to philosophy by creating what is known as the fundamentals of Western philosophy. He invented the teaching practice of pedagogy, the Socratic method and contributed to the fields of ethics, epistemology and logic.
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  • What are the main branches of philosophy?

    Q: What are the main branches of philosophy?

    A: The main branches of philosophy include axiology, epistemology, metaphysics and logic. There are also various subdivisions within the three branches, such as ethics and aesthetics.
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  • Why is it important to pay attention to detail?

    Q: Why is it important to pay attention to detail?

    A: Paying attention to details is important for avoiding errors, maintaining efficiency, preventing injuries, making a good impression and analyzing information. Professionals who are detail-oriented have an advantage in a variety of career fields, including engineering, technology, medicine, science, law, research, accounting and banking.
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  • What is liberal humanism?

    Q: What is liberal humanism?

    A: Liberal humanism is a philosophical stance that highlights the agency and value of human beings, both individually and collectively. Liberal humanists prefer rationalism and evidence rather than religious faith or established doctrines.
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  • What was Socrates' main idea about philosophy?

    Q: What was Socrates' main idea about philosophy?

    A: Socrates believed that true knowledge had to be sought and not taught. To him, life was about internal examination and focus. He eschewed the idea of focusing on the material.
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  • What does "the unexamined life is not worth living" mean?

    Q: What does "the unexamined life is not worth living" mean?

    A: "The unexamined life" refers to a life lived by rote under the rules of others without the subject ever examining whether or not he truly wants to live with those routines or rules. According to Socrates, this type of life was not worth living. Rather than living an unexamined life, Socrates chose death, and these words are attributed to the philosopher during one of his last speeches before his suicide.
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  • What did Robert Hooke do?

    Q: What did Robert Hooke do?

    A: Robert Hooke was one of the great encyclopedic polymaths of 17th-century science. As a founding member of the Royal Society, Hooke made foundational contributions to the fields of astronomy, biology, chemistry, engineering and architecture. His work with springs led to the articulation of what became known as "Hooke's Law," which describes the principles of elasticity
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  • What were the main teachings of John Calvin?

    Q: What were the main teachings of John Calvin?

    A: John Calvin's teachings centered around the complete sovereignty of God's will, which controlled everything in the universe all the time, and the scriptures, which were self-authenticating. He emphasized the hopeless total depravity of humans inherited via original sin from Adam. Regardless of any good or evil outcomes stemming from people's actions, the result was always God's will. To Calvin, salvation from hell was unobtainable by choice or faith, instituting predestination.
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  • What did Plato think about human nature?

    Q: What did Plato think about human nature?

    A: Plato viewed human beings as inherently rational, social souls burdened by imprisonment within their physical bodies. The soul disposition of an individual soul, fixed for eternity, determines the type of human the individual will be in life. The human body, limited and constantly responding to need, is an obstacle to the soul's full realization.
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  • What is the meaning of the quote, "I think, therefore I am"?

    Q: What is the meaning of the quote, "I think, therefore I am"?

    A: The phrase “I think, therefore I am” means that thinking is the one thing that cannot be faked. It is the one way that individuals know they exist.
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  • What are the major contributions of emile Durkheim?

    Q: What are the major contributions of emile Durkheim?

    A: Émile Durkheim was a French sociologist whose major contribution was establishing sociology as a major science. Along with Max Weber and Karl Marx, Durkheim is responsible for establishing social science and social psychology as an academic discipline within the college setting. He is considered the father of social science.
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  • What is the definition of "dualistic thinking"?

    Q: What is the definition of "dualistic thinking"?

    A: Dualistic thinking, according to William Perry's model of intellectual development, is the intellectual ability to understand good and evil but not the nuances inbetween. He believed it was the base level of intellectual development that most college freshmen possessed.
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  • How do we use science in everyday life?

    Q: How do we use science in everyday life?

    A: Science and the variety of innovations it has spawned are used in everyday life on a regular basis. Without science, society would suffer fundamentally in several different areas. There would be no electricity and no plastic, and modern agricultural would be fundamentally crippled. Additionally, the medical community benefits greatly from the use of science and research. Many pharmaceutical companies develop their products with the aid of the scientific method.
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  • What is meant by Weber's iron cage of rationality?

    Q: What is meant by Weber's iron cage of rationality?

    A: Max Weber used the term "iron cage of rationality" to describe what he viewed as a trend in society to move towards a form of bureaucratic rationality that would not realize universal freedom, but rather create an "iron cage" from which there would be no escape. The cause of this trend, Weber believed, stemmed from the expectations and hopes of the Enlightenment thinkers who felt that it was necessary to maintain a strong linkage between the growth of rationality, science and human freedom. Weber saw this as an ironic, bitter illusion.
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  • What was the philosophy of Jean-Jacques Rousseau?

    Q: What was the philosophy of Jean-Jacques Rousseau?

    A: The philosophy of Jean-Jacques Rousseau encompassed an array of theories relating to political philosophy and moral psychology, particularly as they concerned human freedom. His philosophy idealized humans in a state of nature uncorrupted by society and with complete physical freedom. Recognizing a return to the natural state as impossible in modern society, Rousseau conducted philosophical explorations to identify ways to be as free as possible within given constraints.
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  • What does "trust thyself" mean?

    Q: What does "trust thyself" mean?

    A: "Trust thyself" refers to the self-motivational mindset that tells a person to listen to their instincts, mind and heart. Ralph Waldo Emerson said in "Essays," "Trust thyself: every heart vibrates to that iron string." This quote speaks to trusting one's own feelings and avoiding conformity, because choosing conformity sacrifices independence.
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  • What was the contribution of Robert Hooke?

    Q: What was the contribution of Robert Hooke?

    A: Robert Hooke developed the law of elasticity, known as Hooke's Law, which states that stress is directly proportional to strain. He is also the originator of the word "cell" in biology.
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  • What did Chinese immigrants contribute to America?

    Q: What did Chinese immigrants contribute to America?

    A: The construction of the western portion of the first transcontinental railroad, as well as subsequent western railroads in the late 1800s, relied mostly on Chinese immigrants. They comprised more than 90 percent of the total labor force. During this era, Chinese immigrants, mostly men, took on jobs as launderers, cooks and child-care providers in newly established frontier communities and made hefty contributions to business and agricultural sectors in the West.
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  • Why is dignity important?

    Q: Why is dignity important?

    A: Dignity is important because it allows individuals and groups to feel respected, valued and connected with others around them. Dignity and respect are considered basic human rights, and both help people feel a sense of worthiness and importance. Dignity involves a mutual effort among people to listen, understand opinions and values and include one another in conversations.
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