Anthropology

A:

The field of anthropology is usually broken down into four main branches: cultural anthropology, biological anthropology, linguistic anthropology and archaeology. Each separate branch of this discipline seeks to study some aspect of humanity - whether it's culture, language, or human biology and evolution.

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  • What Is a Female Indian Chief Called?

    Q: What Is a Female Indian Chief Called?

    A: Female Indian chiefs are still known as "chiefs" because the title is gender neutral. American Indians, also known as Native Americans, do not have and did not have any restrictions that would prevent a woman from becoming chief. In fact, many famous chiefs were female.
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  • Why Are Trilobites Considered Index Fossils?

    Q: Why Are Trilobites Considered Index Fossils?

    A: Trilobites are considered index fossils because they are used to date geological strata via their presence. They specifically are used to date Paleozoic rock. Index fossils must be widespread, abundant, distinct and limited to a particular time period to be useful; trilobite fossils satisfy these requirements.
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  • What Is the Definition of Physical Anthropology?

    Q: What Is the Definition of Physical Anthropology?

    A: Physical anthropology is the study of humankind's evolutionary changes and of biological differences, including genetic differences, between groups of humans. Anthropology in general is the study of humanity, and social anthropology is the study of human culture. Physical anthropology is sometimes called biological anthropology.
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  • What Was the First Human Race on Earth?

    Q: What Was the First Human Race on Earth?

    A: According to an article published in The Independent, the San people are most likely the oldest human population group to inhabit Earth. The claim is based on an extensive analysis of African DNA in a study published in the journal Science.
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  • How Do People Live in the Rainforest?

    Q: How Do People Live in the Rainforest?

    A: About 50 million tribal people live in rainforests in different parts of the world. Indigenous people have lived there for thousands of years and have organized their daily lives as their ancestors had done. Their food, medicine, shelter and clothing all come from the forests, and they have a distinctive language and a different set of tradition and culture, according to AdventureLife.com.
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  • What Are Types of Human Settlements?

    Q: What Are Types of Human Settlements?

    A: Different types of human settlements include hamlets, villages, small towns, large towns, isolated places, cities and conurbations. In some systems, types of human settlements are broken up into urban, suburban and rural; for example, the U.S. Census Bureau divides settlements into urban or rural categories based on precise definitions.
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  • What Are the Different Branches of Anthropology?

    Q: What Are the Different Branches of Anthropology?

    A: The field of anthropology is usually broken down into four main branches: cultural anthropology, biological anthropology, linguistic anthropology and archaeology. Each separate branch of this discipline seeks to study some aspect of humanity - whether it's culture, language, or human biology and evolution.
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  • What Is an Inuit?

    Q: What Is an Inuit?

    A: An Inuit is an indigenous person from the arctic regions of Canada, Greenland or the United States. The term "Inuit" is often considered a more appropriate designation than the more common "Eskimo."
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  • What Kind of Life Did Pearl Divers Live?

    Q: What Kind of Life Did Pearl Divers Live?

    A: Pearl divers worked long days with little rest, frequently suffering from oxygen deprivation brought on by staying underwater for extended periods of time. Divers often descended into the sea at depths of 100 feet on a single breath, while wearing stone ankle weights and wood or bone nose plugs. Their only protection against the sting of jellyfish was a thin cotton bodysuit.
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  • Do People Live in the Tundra?

    Q: Do People Live in the Tundra?

    A: People live in the tundra, but large population oscillations often occur because of the extreme cold. According to the Arctic Human Development Report, about 4 million people live in the arctic areas.
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  • Why Are Fossils Important?

    Q: Why Are Fossils Important?

    A: Fossils are important in understanding the history of the world because they provide physical evidence of animals and plants that lived in the past. Through their discovery, paleontologists uncover new ideas about former life on earth.
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  • What Do Paleontologists Study?

    Q: What Do Paleontologists Study?

    A: Paleontologists study creatures from ancient times via fossil evidence, geology, models and simulations that help them understand past environments, geological events and the history of life. While paleontologists are associated in the public mind with the study of dinosaurs, their field also studies microscopic creatures, plants and prehistoric humans.
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  • What Are the Advantages of Oral Tradition?

    Q: What Are the Advantages of Oral Tradition?

    A: Oral tradition offers the advantages of inducing open communication and verifiable first-hand knowledge of events from a historical reference point. This practice allows languages to persist and permits practitioners of specialized traditions to show off their skills. Passing along lessons and ideas orally creates ownership of these histories among future generations.
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  • What Is Upper Middle Class?

    Q: What Is Upper Middle Class?

    A: "Upper middle class" is a term used to describe a socioeconomic class. There is no single fixed definition of what the term means, but it is generally used to describe the highest levels of salaried workers and their families, while remaining underneath the upper class.
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  • What Is the Land Bridge Theory?

    Q: What Is the Land Bridge Theory?

    A: In the 19th and early 20th centuries, geologists hypothesized that major landmasses were once connected via an elaborate series of land bridges. This was an attempt to explain the distribution of plants and animals around the world, as it was recognized that populations could not have radiated across the world as they had with the continents in their present configuration.
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  • How Did Geography Affect Early Civilizations?

    Q: How Did Geography Affect Early Civilizations?

    A: According to the Canadian Museum of History, one of the primary ways geography affected early civilizations was in determining the location of settlements. Since early humans needed access to water and fertile ground for agriculture, cities tended to spring up along rivers and flood plains. In addition, geographic features such as mountains frequently served as barriers and provided natural borders between civilizations.
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  • How Did the Incas Adapt to Their Environment?

    Q: How Did the Incas Adapt to Their Environment?

    A: At the height of the Empire in the 16th century, the Inca civilization stretched across the western region of South America between Ecuador and Chile, encompassing land in what is now Peru, Chile, Bolivia and Argentina. This area is mountainous, hot and dry, but nevertheless, the Inca were able to produce food for their large population through adaptive farming practices and the building of advanced irrigation systems.
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  • When Did Homo Habilis Live and for How Long?

    Q: When Did Homo Habilis Live and for How Long?

    A: Homo habilis lived from about about 2 to 1.5 million years ago. This species, one of the earliest known of the Homo genus, lived in Eastern and Southern Africa.
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  • What Are the Types of Human Races?

    Q: What Are the Types of Human Races?

    A: Although in the United States people are often asked to self-identify as either white, Hispanic, African American, Asian or Native American, advanced understanding of DNA reduced the amount of races accepted by scientists to three: European, Asian, African. It is argued, however, that even these three races are not accurate classifications of individuals.
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  • Why Do Some Men Stay Single?

    Q: Why Do Some Men Stay Single?

    A: Despite the pressure that often comes from society and family members, some men make the conscious choice to stay single for various reasons. Freedom, career ambitions and the avoidance of relationship responsibilities are a few of the core motives for men to stay single, according to J Coach.
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  • Who Was the First Person to Live on Earth?

    Q: Who Was the First Person to Live on Earth?

    A: According to the Christian Bible, Adam was the first person, man or woman, to live on earth. However, scientific findings suggest that Adam was not the first human on Earth.
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