ARTICLES

The American Economic Association states that the study of economics is primarily concerned with how people use resources, such as people's time and talent, land, equipment, products and services. Economists and students...

www.reference.com/article/main-concern-study-economics-3ebf30039d0edd7b

The two major branches of economics are microeconomics and macroeconomics. Microeconomics deals largely with the decision-making behavior of individual consumers and firms in markets, while macroeconomics focuses largely...

www.reference.com/world-view/branches-economics-73fa227a430ed69b

Economic diversity is a multidimensional concept that includes the products, workforce skills and capabilities in a local economy, in addition to how well that economy is able to compete in the global marketplace, accord...

www.reference.com/world-view/economic-diversity-f9e7515cc07c6875

SIMILAR ARTICLES

Both history and economics involve the study of events and patterns that have occurred over time and affect the present. This can be put together to be referred to as economic history, which helps people understand all p...

www.reference.com/world-view/relationship-history-economics-a1057f9bfbea5ff

In economics, a price searcher is a person who sells products, goods or services and influences the price of the item by the amount of units sold of each of these commodities. Price searchers generally set their own pric...

www.reference.com/world-view/price-searcher-economics-3449dd549c99ca78

According to Investopedia, microeconomics is the study of decisions made by people and businesses regarding the allocation of resources and prices of goods and services, while macroeconomics is the study of the behavior ...

www.reference.com/article/difference-between-macroeconomics-microeconomics-22a795f82bf65768

In economics, land, labor, capital and entrepreneurship are known as the four factors of production. They are given this label because each plays a role in the production of business and industry that impacts the economi...

www.reference.com/article/four-factors-production-aed4e5ac71a276d1