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www.iflscience.com/space/why-night-sky-black

It sounds obvious. That’s what night is. The sun has set and when you look up at the sky, it’s black. Except where there’s a star, of course. The stars are bright and shiny. But wait ...

spaceplace.nasa.gov/blue-sky

Why is the sky blue? The Short Answer: Sunlight reaches Earth's atmosphere and is scattered in all directions by all the gases and particles in the air. Blue light is scattered more than the other colors because it travels as shorter, smaller waves. This is why we see a blue sky most of the time.

www.scientificamerican.com/article/why-is-the-night-sky-dark

We see stars all around, so why doesn't their combined light add up to make our night sky--and surrounding space, for that matter--bright? German physicist Heinrich Wilhelm Olbers put the same ...

starchild.gsfc.nasa.gov/docs/StarChild/questions/question...

The blue color of the sky is a result of this scattering process. At night, when that part of Earth is facing away from the Sun, space looks black because there is no nearby bright source of light, like the Sun, to be scattered. If you were on the Moon, which has no atmosphere, the sky would be black both night and day.

www.sciencemadesimple.com/space_black_sunset_red.html

Why is Space Black? We've all see pictures of the blackness of space. And who hasn't enjoyed a colorful sunset or sunrise? Once you understand the science behind why the sky is blue, these other questions are easy to answer.

www.webexhibits.org/causesofcolor/14.html

Why isn’t the sky black? We see the sky as colored because our atmosphere interacts with the sunlight passing through it. This phenomenon is called "scattering." The type of scattering responsible for blue sky is known as Rayleigh scattering.

theconversation.com/explainer-why-is-the-night-sky-black-51503

It sounds obvious. That’s what night is. The sun has set and when you look up at the sky, it’s black. Except where there’s a star, of course. The stars are bright and shiny. But wait ...

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Olbers'_paradox

In astrophysics and physical cosmology, Olbers' paradox, named after the German astronomer Heinrich Wilhelm Olbers (1758–1840), also known as the "dark night sky paradox", is the argument that the darkness of the night sky conflicts with the assumption of an infinite and eternal static universe.

theconversation.com/curious-kids-why-is-the-sky-blue-and-where...

Why is the sky blue and where does it start? – Oliver Scott, age 7, Wombarra. This is something that parents get asked every day. And it’s a great question, Oliver!

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sky

The fact that the sky is not completely dark at night can be easily observed. Were the sky (in the absence of moon and city lights) absolutely dark, one would not be able to see the silhouette of an object against the sky. The night sky and studies of it have a historical place in both ancient and modern cultures.