To clean pennies, make a vinegar solution, and let the penny soak for five to 15 minutes before rinsing and drying the penny. Polish it further with baking soda if the shine isn't satisfactory. Avoid cleaning collectible... More »

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One way to clean old pennies is to soak them a solution of salt and vinegar. A mixture of ¼ cup of vinegar and 1 tablespoon of salt cleans 20 to 30 pennies in about five minutes. More »

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Juices with an acidic base, such as lemon, dissolve the tarnish, which is copper oxide, from a dull penny. Other substances, such as Coke, Pepsi and vinegar, also make a penny shiny again. More »

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Most 1943 pennies were made of zinc-coated steel. However, due to copper-alloy penny blanks being left in the press before production, a small amount of 1943 pennies were made with copper alloy. More »

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The 1943 copper-alloy cent is rare because, due to rationing for World War II, the vast majority of pennies struck that year were made of zinc-coated steel. The American Numismatic Association reports less than 50 of the... More »

Circulated 1963 pennies are only worth face value, however a penny in mint, uncirculated condition can be worth anywhere from $.05 to $.35 or more, as of 2014. The value of the penny is greatly dependent on the condition... More »

As of 2014, collectors value pennies minted in 1943 from 8 cents to $3.14, depending on the coin's condition and where it was minted. Coins in good condition minted in Philadelphia have the lowest value, while uncirculat... More »

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