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www.quora.com/What-is-time-How-is-time-affected-by-gravity

Hi, Time runs slow in region where the gravitational potential is higher (as gravity curves space) This can be understood by just knowing the fact that it takes more time to travel larger distances than shorter distances, for the same speed.

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gravitational_time_dilation

Gravitational time dilation is a form of time dilation, an actual difference of elapsed time between two events as measured by observers situated at varying distances from a gravitating mass.The higher the gravitational potential (the farther the clock is from the source of gravitation),faster the time passes. Albert Einstein originally predicted this effect in his theory of relativity and it ...

thescienceexplorer.com/...gravity-changes-time-effect-known-gravitational-time-dilation

The explanation comes down to what scientists call Gravitational Time Dilation. This effect measures the amount of time that has elapsed between two events by observers at different distances from a gravitational mass. In other words, time runs slower wherever gravity is strongest, and this is because gravity curves space-time.

www.physicsforums.com/threads/why-does-gravity-affect-time.713213

Gravity doesn't affect "time", it affects "spacetime". This is not just semantics. There are plenty of place on the internet to read about this.

www.youtube.com/watch?v=1ENkP0h8nAg

Explains how and why gravity affects the flow of time according to General Relativity. Explains how and why gravity affects the flow of time according to General Relativity. Skip navigation

www.physicsforums.com/threads/why-does-gravity-affect-time-in-space.831582

No, it doesn't. It only implies that the "rate of time flow" is different. The argument based on the equivalence principle does not require there to be any change in acceleration from the bottom to the top of the enclosure; it goes through perfectly well if the bottom and top are both accelerated exactly the same, which means the "acceleration due to gravity" of a free-fall...

physics.stackexchange.com/questions/201808/why-does-gravity-affect-time

Now according to the equivalence principle between acceleration and gravity, since they're equivalent, therefore gravity should affect time as well. Also I am aware of that the change who deserves attention is at the fraction of the speed of light because it's more notable at that point

physics.stackexchange.com/.../how-exactly-does-time-slow-down-near-a-black-hole

How exactly does time slow down near a black hole? I have heard this as a possible way of time traveling, and I do understand that it is due in some way to the massive gravity around a black hole, but how exactly does that massive gravity slow down time?

socratic.org/questions/why-does-gravity-affect-time

The greater the gravity the greater the curving of space time and therefore the greater the increase in the distance light must travel around the curving space. This means the greater the gravity the slower the time. Note using light years distance traveled by light to measure time is invalid as gravity affect the time.