Woodpeckers peck trees to search for food and to create nesting sites, according to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. They also peck in rapid succession or drum on resonating metal or wood surfaces to establish their t... More »

Woodpeckers peck wood for several reasons, primarily to search for small tree-boring insects to eat or to create a nesting site. A woodpecker also pecks wood in a rhythmic, rapid succession in order to establish its terr... More »

www.reference.com Pets & Animals Birds

The 215 species of woodpeckers, which are native to all continents except Antarctica and Australia, peck at up to 20 times per second. These birds peck and drum to get at food, store food, make nests, establish territory... More »

The 215 species of woodpeckers, which are native to all continents except Antarctica and Australia, peck at up to 20 times per second. These birds peck and drum to get at food, store food, make nests, establish territory... More »

There are many independent organizations that protect bald eagles, however, the two most prominent organizations are through the United States federal government: the National Parks Conservation Association and the U.S. ... More »

www.reference.com Pets & Animals Birds

The eagle soars at the top of the food chain with no natural predators, according to the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. The eagles' only predator is man, through habitat destruction, poisoning of its food supply and ill... More »

www.reference.com Pets & Animals Birds Eagles

To repel pigeons effectively, eliminate food and water sources on the property, close entrances to indoor roosting sites, and install porcupine wire or paste repellents on the birds' roosting sites. Use nylon mesh to pre... More »