Web Results

www.nytimes.com/2013/07/23/science/how-does-a-plant-with...

Q. My tree has red leaves all year. How does a plant support itself without green chlorophyll? A. Some parasitic plants lack chlorophyll entirely and steal the products of photosynthesis from ...

www.webexhibits.org/causesofcolor/7A.html

Why do some plants appear green? Green plants are green because they contain a pigment called chlorophyll. Chlorophyll absorbs certain wavelengths of light within the visible light spectrum. As shown in detail in the absorption spectra, chlorophyll absorbs light in the red (long wavelength) and the ...

www.livescience.com/39145-why-are-plants-purple.html

Most of the plants you see on a daily basis are green, but every so often you might happen upon the odd purple-leafed tree or shrub. Why do some plants have these purple parts? The answer lies ...

www.researchgate.net/post/Why_are_plants_green

Why are plants green? ... it is obvious that chloroplasts confer green color to the plant. Some plants are pink or even dark red but they do contain chloroplasts but they are masked by other ...

scienceline.ucsb.edu/getkey.php?key=1110

Chlorophyll just absorbs blue and red light; it hardly absorbs any green light at all, so the green gets reflected back to our eyes, which is why leaves appear green. Other pigments that plants have in their leaves absorb light of different colors, so they reflect red, orange, yellow, or blue light and appear to be those colors to our eyes.

biology.stackexchange.com/questions/450

Tobias Keinzler does a good job of explaining why black plants would not work, this is an explanation of why plants are green and not some other color. Color of foliage is based on whatever the color is of bacteria (or archaea) that get incorporated to become chloroplasts.

feedthedatamonster.com/home/2015/2/3/why-are-some-plants-red

(Chlorophyll absorbs blue and red, which is why most leaves are green.) Seasonality can affect the amount of anthocyanin pigments produced within leaves. Sabah used autumnal leaves as an example. Throughout my winter-time salad green studies, seasonal temperature and light changes had visible effects on the color of red plant varieties.

homeguides.sfgate.com/tropical-plants-green-red-leaves...

Shades of red on foliage are evidence of an adaptation the plant has made to help it deal with life in the rainforest. Red undersides of leaves tend to reflect sunlight back into the leaf, thus ...

www.quora.com/Why-did-some-plants-develop-with-red-purple...

In nature some plants develop red, yellow, brown leaf color according to their age, growth stage, season etc. Some plants produce dark red young leaves for protection against insect, while old leaves of many plants turn yellow, orange, brown or red due to senescence (programmed death of leaf) or chlorosis (Loss of green chlorophyll).

earthsky.org/earth/why-do-tree-leaves-turn-red-in-fall

In some cases, about half of a tree’s leaves are red/orange and the other half green. Dudle says that results from micro-environmental factors – such as only half the tree being exposed to ...