Examples of some of the most common contractions in the English language include isn't, aren't, wasn't, weren't, didn't, don't, wouldn't, couldn't and o'clock. Others are can't, there's, that's, what's, he's, they've and... More »

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Contractions are used in everyday speaking and in informal writing. A contraction is a shortened version of two or more words, generally formed by placing an apostrophe in the place of any deleted letters. More »

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The correct contraction of "will not" is written as "won't." Like many other contractions, it is used in informal writings such as newspapers, fiction and instructions, explains the Goodwill Community Foundation. However... More »

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The word "put" is most often used as a verb in the English language to indicate the effort of placement, both literally and figuratively. "Put" is also a noun, naming the throw of a weight or shot. More »

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The longest word in the English language is pneumonoultramicroscopicsilicovolcanokoniosis, with 45 letters. It is an obscure term for a lung disease. The next longest word is the medical term hepaticocholangiocholecysten... More »

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The only two-letter word beginning with "c" in the English language is "ca'," according to Merriam Webster. The word ca' is the Scottish variant of the word call. More »

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One method of studying prefixes in the English language is to memorize commonly used affixes as well as the meanings each extends to the attached root word, called a stem. Prefixes such as "re-," meaning "again," and "di... More »

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