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www.dictionary.com/browse/the

another word for per, esp with nouns or noun phrases of cost fifty pence the pound. often facetious, or derogatory my; our the wife goes out on Thursdays. used preceding a unit of time in phrases or titles indicating an outstanding person, event, etc match of the day; player of the year.

www.gotquestions.org/Jesus-Bible-Word-God.html

Question: "How can Jesus and the Bible both be the Word of God?" Answer: The phrase “word of God” appears often in the Bible and can have a slightly different meaning depending on context and the Hebrew or Greek word used. John 1:1 says, “In the beginning was the Word. And the Word was with God and the Word was God.

www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/the

If the word that follows the begins with a consonant sound, then it's pronounced \t͟hə\—that is, with the same vowel sound as the word of—and it is unstressed: the water. the house. the bell. the one (Note that although "o" is a vowel, the word one begins with the sound usually made by "w," a consonant.)

www.trussel.com/the.htm

The is one of the grammatical words of English. It does not have any real meaning by itself, but rather it is used as a way of sending a signal about other words. The words it sends signals about are always nouns. In that sense English is a rather materialistic language. The word the is used to help us talk about things, rather than events. The ...

www.jw.org/en/bible-teachings/questions/word-of-god

The expression “the word of God” usually refers to a divine message or to a collection of those messages. In a few places, “The Word of God” or “the Word” is used as a personal title —Revelation 19:13; John 1: 14. A divine message. The prophets often stated that the messages they delivered were God’s word.

www.dictionary.com/e/word-of-the-day

The word shows polysemy, which ultimately derives from Greek polýsēmos "having many meanings." Polýsēmos joins polýs "many, much," and sêma "sign, mark, token." Polýs yields the combining form poly-, seen in many English words, such as polygon "many angles" or polytheism "many gods."

www.thefreedictionary.com/word

word (wûrd) n. 1. A sound or a combination of sounds, or its representation in writing or printing, that symbolizes and communicates a meaning and may consist of a single morpheme or of a combination of morphemes. 2. a. Something said; an utterance, remark, or comment: May I say a word about that? b. A command or direction; an order: gave the word to ...

slate.com/human-interest/2013/11/the-word-the-why-the...

It’s the most frequent word in the English language, accounting for around four percent of all the words we write or speak. It’s everywhere, all the time, so clearly it must be doing something ...

www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/is

On Contractions of Multiple Words. You all would not have guessed some of these. A Look at Uncommon Onomatopoeia. Some imitative words are more surprising than others . Literally. How to use a word that (literally) drives some people nuts. Is Singular 'They' a Better Choice? The awkward case of 'his or her'

www.ef.edu/english-resources/english-grammar/definite-article

The word "the" is one of the most common words in English. It is our only definite article. Nouns in English are preceded by the definite article when the speaker believes that the listener already knows what he is referring to. The speaker may believe this for many different reasons, some of which are listed below. When to use "the" General rules Use the to refer to