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en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sherry

Sherry (Spanish: Jerez) is a fortified wine made from white grapes that are grown near the city of Jerez de la Frontera in Andalusia, Spain.Sherry is produced in a variety of styles made primarily from the Palomino grape, ranging from light versions similar to white table wines, such as Manzanilla and Fino, to darker and heavier versions that have been allowed to oxidise as they age in barrel ...

www.anniebspain.com/educate-me-on-sherry-with-pleasure-2

Sherry is fortified with a spirit made from grapes which then in turn is aged in old Sherry casks, producing Brandy de Jerez. AGED: All Sherry is aged. The youngest Sherry you will ever drink will be three years old. BLENDED: 98% of all Sherry is non-vintage; it is a blend of different vintages. Only Oloroso can be a vintage.

www.yahoo.com/lifestyle/what-is-sherry-and-why-should-you...

In simple terms, sherry is a wine produced in Jerez de la Frontera, Sanlucar de Barrameda, and El Puerto de Santa Maria. It is a fortified wine, which means that a small amount of neutral grape ...

www.sherrynotes.com/2013/background/sherry-production-process

I know a lot of people out there are still struggling with the different types of sherry. Why is a Fino different from an Amontillado or a Pedro Ximénez, or what makes a Pale Cream different from a regular Cream?To get a detailed insight, we would need to explain how each type is made and how the production process differs from other types.

manofmany.com/.../what-is-the-difference-between-port-sherry

Sherry, meanwhile, comes from white grapes grown in the “Sherry triangle,” located just outside the town of Jerez, Spain. The word “Sherry” actually derives from the name Jerez. How are Fortified Wines Made? To make fortified wine, producers add a distilled spirit—most commonly brandy—to a base wine during the production process.

www.winespectator.com/drvinny/show/id/5303

Cream Sherry doesn't have any dairy in it, but it is sweet and dark, in the oloroso style. How did it get its name? The story goes that a woman attending a Sherry tasting in the late 1800s sampled a variety of traditional Sherry, which was nicknamed "Bristol's Milk" (named after the British port of ...

davesgarden.com/guides/articles/view/4500

What to eat with sherry Very sweet sherry, made from Pedro Ximénez grapes which are then dried like raisins, reportedly goes well with desserts or on top of ice cream. Dry, fino sherry goes well with salty foods like nuts, hard cheese, olives or seafood.

www.thespruceeats.com/sherry-wine-information-3511309

Cream Sherry - Rich mahogany in color and velvety smooth in texture, a sweet Sherry made from Amontillado or Oloroso and sweetened with PX. Perfect with cheesecake. Pedro Ximénez - Is an ultra sweet almost syrup-like dessert Sherry, made from sweet, sun-dried grapes of the same name. Its alcohol content is on the lower end of the spectrum and ...

www.wineanorak.com/sherry.htm

Sherry is a fortified wine made from vineyards in the far south of Spain, where extreme heat—summer temperatures regularly exceed 40 ºC—is countered by cooling breezes from the Atlantic. Table wines made from here wouldn’t be terribly exciting, but the complex process of Sherry production, including the addition of spirit once ...

www.winemag.com/2015/03/04/sherry-decoded-top-styles...

The driest, most saline style of Sherry, it’s generally made from high-acid Palomino grapes grown in chalky white soils called albariza.