ARTICLES

Some examples of pathogenic bacteria are Bacillus anthracis, Escherichia coli, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Salmonella and Vibrio cholerae. These particular pathogens are easily transmitted through water, and prior to mod...

www.reference.com/article/examples-pathogenic-bacteria-23a60e04316f8cc6

All pathogenic bacteria, by definition, live inside the human body, because that is the method by which they cause disease. A pathogen is anything that causes disease in its host; without the host, disease is not possibl...

www.reference.com/article/pathogenic-bacteria-usually-live-51975119d31112bb

A list of non-pathogenic bacteria is an outline of the types of bacteria that do not cause illnesses in humans. They include staphylococcus, lactobacillus, Escherichia coli, bifidobacteria, bacteroides and Brevibacterium...

www.reference.com/science/list-non-pathogenic-bacteria-9c256daf549161a1

SIMILAR ARTICLES

Bacillus anthracis, Clostridium botulinum, Vibrio Cholerae, Staphylococcus aureus and Mycobacterium tuberculosis are among the most harmful known bacteria, according to the National Academies of Sciences, Engineering and...

www.reference.com/article/harmful-known-bacteria-77b5384314ca7ab9

All pathogenic bacteria, by definition, live inside the human body, because that is the method by which they cause disease. A pathogen is anything that causes disease in its host; without the host, disease is not possibl...

www.reference.com/article/pathogenic-bacteria-usually-live-51975119d31112bb

Some types of Gram-negative bacteria including Escherichia coli, Vibrio cholerae and Yersinia pestis. These bacteria are responsible for food-borne diseases, cholera and plague, respectively. Many types of Gram-negative ...

www.reference.com/article/different-types-gram-negative-bacteria-e9adf3a00a93e185

Mycobacterium tuberculosis is a rod-shaped, immobile bacteria, says Kenneth Todar of Todar's Online Textbook of Bacteriology. It thrives only in the presence of oxygen and is an intracellular parasite.

www.reference.com/article/morphology-mycobacterium-tuberculosis-338cdf5e33f066bf