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www.edinformatics.com/math_science/what-is-helium-3.html

Helium-3 was originally thought to be a radioactive isotope until it was found in samples of natural helium,, taken both from the terrestrial atmosphere and from natural gas wells. Other than 1H, helium-3 is the only stable isotope of any element with more protons than neutrons.

www.explainingthefuture.com/helium3.html

Helium-3 (He3) is gas that has the potential to be used as a fuel in future nuclear fusion power plants. There is very little helium-3 available on the Earth. However, there are thought to be significant supplies on the Moon. Several governments have subsequently signalled their intention to go to the Moon to mine helium-3 as a fuel supply.

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Helium-3

Helium-3 (3 He, tralphium, see also helion) is a light, stable isotope of helium with two protons and one neutron (common helium-4 having two protons and two neutrons). Other than protium (ordinary hydrogen), helium-3 is the only stable isotope of any element with more protons than neutrons.Helium-3 was discovered in 1939.

www.quora.com/What-is-helium-3

Helium-3 (He-3) is a light, non-radioactive isotope of helium with two protons and one neutron. It is rare on Earth, and it is sought for use in nuclear fusion research. The abundance of helium-3 is thought to be greater on the Moon (embedded in t...

www.popularmechanics.com/space/moon-mars/a235/1283056

Known as helium-3, it is a lightweight isotope of the familiar gas that fills birthday balloons. Small quantities of helium-3 previously discovered on Earth intrigued the scientific community.

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Helium

Some stable helium-3 (2 protons and 1 neutron) is produced in fusion reactions from hydrogen, but it is a very small fraction compared to the highly favorable helium-4. Binding energy per nucleon of common isotopes. The binding energy per particle of helium-4 is significantly larger than all nearby nuclides.

www.esa.int/.../Space_for_Earth/Energy/Helium-3_mining_on_the_lunar_surface

The idea of harvesting a clean and efficient form of energy from the Moon has stimulated science fiction and fact in recent decades. Unlike Earth, which is protected by its magnetic field, the Moon has been bombarded with large quantities of Helium-3 by the solar wind. It is thought that this isotope could provide safer nuclear energy in a fusion reactor, since it is not radioactive and would ...

www.exponentialinvestor.com/commodities/helium-3-prices-are-out-of-this-world

Helium-3 is the same as “normal” helium-4, but with one less neutron in the nucleus. This missing neutron in helium-3 makes it behave very differently at very low temperatures, giving it an important role in cryogenics.

www.bbvaopenmind.com/en/science/physics/helium-3-lunar-gold-fever

In 1986, scientists at the Institute of Fusion Technology at the University of Wisconsin estimated that the lunar “soil”, called the regolith, contains one million tons of helium-3 (3 He), a material that could be used as fuel to produce energy by nuclear fusion.According to the study, mining it would be a profitable undertaking: the energy produced by the helium-3 would be 250 times ...

www.britannica.com/science/helium-chemical-element

The trace of the isotope helium-3 on Earth is attributable to the negative beta decay of the rare hydrogen-3 isotope . Helium-4 is by far the most plentiful of the stable isotopes: helium-4 atoms outnumber those of helium-3 about 700,000:1 in atmospheric helium and about 7,000,000:1 in certain helium-bearing minerals.