The most famous examples of hamartia include the actions of Hamlet in Shakespeare's play of the same name, the behavior of Oedipus in "Oedipus the King" by Sophocles and the conduct of Victor in "Frankenstein," a novel b... More »

In Sophocles’ play, "Oedipus Rex," Oedipus’ hamartia, or tragic flaw, is his arrogance. This arrogance leads him to search for a truth that ultimately destroys his life. More »

A hamartia is a "tragic flaw" in the protagonist, and it is directly translated as a mistake or error in judgment. An example would be that Oedipus is said to have a hasty temper; that would be a character flaw that coul... More »

Most of Shakespeare's tragic heroes have some kind of tragic flaw, including Hamlet's hesitant nature and Romeo and Juliet's impatience, along with the protagonists of many classical tragedies, such as Oedipus and his ne... More »

Some of the allusions in Mary Shelley's novel "Frankenstein" include the Greek myth of Prometheus, biblical Adam and Eve and The Rime of the Ancient Mariner. These allusions help Shelley build upon her theme of the dange... More »

An example of a tragic hero in literature is Hamlet in William Shakespeare's "Hamlet" or Oedipus in Sophocles's "Oedipus Plays." The tragic hero in literature is a character who is born of noble birth and heroic traits b... More »

In Sophocles’ play, "Oedipus Rex," Oedipus’ hamartia, or tragic flaw, is his arrogance. This arrogance leads him to search for a truth that ultimately destroys his life. More »