The vertices of a polygon is the point where two sides of the polygon intersect or the point that is the farthest away from the base of the polygon. The number of vertices a polygon has is determined by the type of polyg... More »

Vertices are the points, or corners, in geometrical and mathematical shapes where two or more lines meet but do not cross, according to Math Open Reference. Vertices can exist in two-dimensional and three-dimensional sha... More »

A cylinder has zero vertices. A cylinder does not have a vertex because there is no point where two lines meet. This is because a cylinder, unlike a prism, has circular faces; there is no corner where two straight lines ... More »

The centroid of any triangle, right triangles included, is the point where the angle bisectors of all three vertices of a triangle intersect. Given a triangle made from a sufficiently rigid and uniform material, the cent... More »

A square is a polygon with four vertices. The shape has four equal sides and four 90-degree angles; thus, it is called a regular quadrilateral. The sides meet in four corners, which are called vertices. More »

The incenter of a triangle is defined as the point where all three angle bisectors intersect. It can be found using a compass and a straight edge by constructing the angle bisectors of any two vertices of the triangle an... More »

One common example of perpendicular lines in real life is the point where two city roads intersect. When one road crosses another, the two streets join at right angles to each other and form a cross-type pattern. Perpend... More »