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www.reference.com/article/normal-range-crp-levels-ead0f1745d67a22b

The normal range for C-reactive protein, or CRP, is less than 1.0 milligram per deciliter or less than 10 milligrams per liter, reports WebMD. The CRP blood test measures the amount of C-reactive protein in the blood. Doctors use CRP testing to judge the level of inflam...

www.reference.com/article/blood-crp-level-cd994bcb02008eec

A blood CRP, or C-reactive protein, level is measured to determine if inflammation is present in the body, according to MedlinePlus. A positive CRP is usually abnormal and indicates an inflammatory process, such as cancer, infection or heart attack. A positive CRP is no...

www.reference.com/article/normal-range-crp-53364a06c2ef58e6

The normal range of CRP (C-Reactive Protein) is less than 1 milligram per deciliter of blood as stated by WebMD. The ranges of CRP testing and values vary from lab to lab. In addition, sudden or severe inflammation can increase CRP levels while certain medicines can dec...

www.reference.com/article/causes-high-crp-levels-5e5c7f7ff30232ec

High levels of C-reactive protein are caused by the inflammation that accompanies certain infections and serious diseases, says WebMD. The measurement determines the level of inflammation within the body, but tests do not indicate where the inflammation occurs.

www.reference.com/article/normal-crp-count-b10ed865ef55cd0

Typically, "zero" is the normal CRP count, as stated by MedlinePlus. The presence of CRP, or C-reactive protein, usually indicates inflammation somewhere in the body.

www.reference.com/article/reduce-crp-levels-fec4075feac8eb37

There are several ways to reduce C-reactive protein, or CRP levels, including regular physical activities, avoiding saturated fats and eating dietary fiber, according to About.com. Watching one’s weight and maintaining good dental health help reduce CRP levels.

www.reference.com/article/normal-range-crp-test-64820c84d64bbdf5

The normal range in a C-reactive protein test is less than 1.0 milligram per deciliter or less than 10 milligrams per liter, according to WebMD. Normal values, called a reference range, may vary depending on the lab and are only a guide for what is considered normal.