Water evaporates faster at higher temperatures, when its surface area increases and when exposed to moving air. The concentration of water and other substances in the surrounding air and air pressure also affect evaporat... More »

Alcohols, such as ethanol and methanol, evaporate at a rate similar to other compounds of their type, but water evaporates comparatively slowly because of its strong bonds. Water molecules easily form hydrogen bonds with... More »

Salt water does not evaporate faster than fresh water; in fact, fresh water always evaporates faster than salt water. This is because of the difference between the salt and water molecules. Water is a slightly volatile s... More »

Salt water does not evaporate faster than fresh water; in fact, fresh water always evaporates faster than salt water. This is because of the difference between the salt and water molecules. Water is a slightly volatile s... More »

Water evaporates when molecules at the interface of water and air have enough energy to escape the forces that hold them together in the liquid. Evaporation, along with boiling, is a type of vaporization. More »

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All other factors being equal, ice melts faster in water than it does in air. As ice melts in air, the liquid that forms around the ice acts as an insulator, slowing down the melting of the ice. This does not occur if th... More »

www.reference.com Science Chemistry States of Matter

Collect water from the air by condensing it onto a plastic or glass surface, as outlined on beforeitsnews.com. Place a glass bowl over some grass or other vegetation on a sunny day, and wait about 30 minutes. When the in... More »

www.reference.com Science Chemistry States of Matter