Lipids are organic compounds that can include substances, such as fats, waxes, phospholipids and steroids. Depending on the type of lipid formed, it can consist of different combinations of molecules including fatty acid... More »

Lipids are a diverse group of biological compounds, but they share the general property of being at least partially not water soluble and are composed of a series of hydrocarbon chains, ending with groups of bonded hydro... More »

Lipids, often referred to as fats, are one of the four macromolecules required by all living organisms. The Elmhurst College Virtual Chembook states that the primary function of lipids is to store energy for later use. More »

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Some examples of lipids include cholesterol and steroids, vegetable oil, butter, phospholipids, waxes and fat-soluble vitamins. Lipids are compounds that are insoluble in water but soluble in one or more organic solvents... More »

The three types of lipids are: steroids, triglycerides and phospholipids. Each of these macromolecules is hydrophobic and therefore remains largely insoluble in water. Apart from that common factor, lipids are chemically... More »

The smooth endoplasmic reticulum, or smooth ER, performs functions in several metabolic processes, including synthesis of steroids, lipids and phospholipids, as well as the metabolism of carbohydrates, elimination of dru... More »

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Examples of hydrophobic substances include fats, oils, waxes, alkanes and other greasy substances. The term hydrophobic comes from the Greek and is translated as “having a horror of water” or “water fearing.” More »