Web Results

answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=20081023150834AAtd1wc

Yes. Mountains are the effect of seismic activity otherwise known as a volcanic eruption. The volcanoes in the Appalachian trail are considered to be extinct (least likely to erupt again). So in essence, the Appalachian Mountains are just a big group of extinct volcanoes.

www.scientificamerican.com/article/recent-east-coast-volcano

When Was the Last Time Volcanoes Erupted on the East Coast? Volcanoes on the East Coast of North America are more recent than you think—and they may be why the region still suffers relatively ...

www.visitmysmokies.com/blog/smoky-mountains/active-volcano...

How the Volcano was Discovered . Scientists from the National Park Service began considering the possibility that a volcano could exist in the region after an earthquake hit the Smoky Mountains in February 2015. Although the 2.1 magnitude earthquake was a minor tremor, it raised red flags among geologists.

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Appalachian_Mountains

The Appalachian Mountains, often called the Appalachians, are a system of mountains in eastern North America. The Appalachians first formed roughly 480 million years ago during the Ordovician Period. They once reached elevations similar to those of the Alps and the Rocky Mountains before experiencing natural erosion.

www.answers.com/Q/Are_there_volcanoes_in_the_Appalachian...

Appalachian mountains The Appalachian mountains are located in the Eastern part of the USA. This range, recently traced as far south as New Mexico, extends north thru Newfoundland and crosses the ...

www.simplyappalachian.com/article/2015/07/earthquakes-appalachia

Earthquake history in Appalachia. You may think that California and the Far East are the places most at risk for earthquakes, but the mountains of the Appalachians have had their share of earth-shattering quakes throughout history. And researchers predict the Eastern mountain range is ripe for more.

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Geology_of_the_Appalachians

The geology of the Appalachians dates back to more than 480 million years ago. A look at rocks exposed in today's Appalachian Mountains reveals elongate belts of folded and thrust faulted marine sedimentary rocks, volcanic rocks and slivers of ancient ocean floor - strong evidence that these rocks were deformed during plate collision.

greatdreams.com/earthquake/ancient-us-volcano.html

1-16-11 DREAM: i was living in southern Wisconsin, and my mother-in-law came to visit our family. She drew us a map of the Eastern half of the United States and drew lines on it that included all the ancient magma tunnels under the surface that were going to soon let lava flow from an ancient volcano that was soon to come to life in North//South Carolina, and work its way all the way up ...

quizlet.com/142399663/science-finalplate-tectonics-part-1...

Start studying science final/plate tectonics part 1. Learn vocabulary, terms, and more with flashcards, games, and other study tools. ... the volcanoes in Iceland formed as a result of magma rising upward into faults and fractures that form as crustal plates diverge. ... the Appalachian Mountains still exist because of _____ isostatic rebound.

pubs.usgs.gov/gip/birth/birth.pdf

Birth of the Mountains The Geologic Story of the Southern Appalachian Mountains . VA NC WVA KY TN AL GA Atlanta SC Roanoke Asheville Knoxville Chattanooga Location of the Southern Appalachians Front and back covers. ... that some new volcanoes have erupted. The mountains and rivers would