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www.cookinglight.com/food/in-season/discovering-fennel

Like celery, the entire fennel plant is edible and lends itself to a wide variety of cooking applications. In fact, this mildly licorice-flavored plant is a member of the parsley family. Lastly, we can't ignore the health benefits of fennel. Just one cup of fennel contains almost 20 percent of your recommended daily value of vitamin C.

www.eatingwell.com/article/7527554/what-are-fennel-seeds-and-how-do-you-cook-with-them

Use fennel seeds for pickling vegetables, seasoning sausage or making a crust for fish or beef fillets. You'll soon realize that aromatic fennel seeds can elevate the most basic recipes. Fennel seeds also offer benefits in the way of vitamins, minerals and fiber, so you can feel good about working them into your weekly meal plan.

www.myrecipes.com/how-to/cooking-questions/what-is-fennel

Fennel stalks can take the place of celery in certain recipes (like soups) and can add texture and flavor to other would-be boring dishes. Fennel bulbs are extremely versatile and are often shredded and added to salads, braised with meat, pureed into soups and sauces, or simply roasted and served alone.

www.itscookin.com/2008/12/12-ways-to-cook-fennel

Fennel is a wonderful, versatile aromatic vegetable that could be used in numerous dishes and utilizing many cooking methods. This vegetable is widely used in Italian, French and Mediterranean cooking. I have been experimenting with it for over a few years and keep stumbling on more innovative ways to cook it.

www.allrecipes.com/recipes/1085

With the flavor of sweet anise, fennel is a great addition in soups, pasta, salads, and more. ... Fennel Soup, Fennel in Wine and Honey, Fennel and Watercress Salad, Fennel Risotto, Potatoes Au Gratin with Fennel and Bacon

www.reluctantgourmet.com/fennel-how-to-use-it

All About Fennel & How to Cook With It. On the whole, the foods that restaurants deliver to the consumer use basically the same ingredients that a home cook would use. There is, however, a short list of ingredients that are commonly used in commercial kitchens that are underused by home cooks.

www.thekitchn.com/top-5-ways-to-use-fennel-stalks-and-fronds-ingredient...

Most recipes with fennel, like our Shaved Fennel, Roasted Tomato, and Pistachio Salad from yesterday, focus on the crunchy bulb, leaving us in a lurch when it comes to the leftover stalks and fronds. Fennel tops are tasty too! No sense in letting these greens go to waste. Here are some favorite ways to use them up.The lacy fronds have a delicate anise flavor and are so tender that they ...

www.tasteofhome.com/collection/fennel-recipes

Fresh fennel has a large bulbous base and pale green stems with wispy foliage. Often mislabeled as sweet anise, it has a sweeter and more delicate flavor than anise.

www.finedininglovers.com/article/how-use-fennel-beginners-guide

Fennel is a hugely versatile vegetable that grows easily, keeps well, and forms the basis of many dishes, from appetisers to desserts, particularly in Italian cuisine.. Imparting distinctive, yet subtle aniseed notes that vary in intensity, depending on whether it's eaten raw or cooked, knowing how to use fennel gives you access to a wonderfully useful vegetable.

www.thekitchn.com/cooking-with-fennel-use-the-whole-bulb-187163

Has fennel crossed your kitchen threshold yet? If you’ve never tried fennel, it helps to know that it’s used as an herb as frequently as a vegetable. It is very aromatic, with a slightly sweet, little-bit-spicy anise flavor. The super versatile bulb is shredded to make salads and side dishes, braised with chicken or fish for heartier dinners, and pureed into soups and sauces.