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www.thekitchn.com/inside-the-spice-cabinet-mace-99715

While mace can be used in sweet dishes similar to nutmeg, this spice really shines in savory dishes. It’s often used in spice blends for flavoring meat dishes, stews, curries, savory sauces, homemade pickles, and is a common ingredient in Indian cuisine.

www.wisegeek.com/what-is-the-spice-called-mace.htm

Obviously, in things like baked goods and roast meats, the mace is added at the beginning, along with all the other ingredients. Mace can be used much like nutmeg would in things like cakes, scones, and spice cookies. It can also be used in curries, soups, cream sauces, roasts, and a range of other ingredients.

www.webmd.com/vitamins/ai/ingredientmono-788/nutmeg-and-mace

Nutmeg and mace are commonly used spices in foods. It is POSSIBLY UNSAFE to take nutmeg and mace in doses larger than amounts found in foods and for long periods of time. Long-term use of nutmeg ...

www.nutrition-and-you.com/mace-spice.html

Mace spice nutrition facts Mace spice is a dried, outer aril, enveloping firmly around the nutmeg kernel. Nutmeg kernel and mace arils indeed are two separate spice products of same nutmeg fruit. However, spice-mace has characteristically composed higher concentration of certain essential oils and features refined, yet more intense aroma than nutmeg.

www.mccormick.com/spices-and-flavors/herbs-and-spices/spices/mace-ground

An aromatic golden brown spice obtained from the dried aril (net-like sheath) which covers the Nutmeg seed, Myristica fragrans Houtt. Mace is yellowish-tan to reddish-tan in color, made up of flat, hornlike, shiny branched pieces with a fragrant, nutmeglike aromatic odor and warm taste. Mace and nutmeg are from the same tree, a large evergreen tree native to the Moluccas Islands and the East ...

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mace_(spice)

Spice. Nutmeg and mace have similar sensory qualities, with nutmeg having a slightly sweeter and mace a more delicate flavour. Mace is often preferred in light dishes for the bright orange, saffron-like hue it imparts. Nutmeg is used for flavouring many dishes, and nowadays is mostly found in Western supermarkets in ground or grated form.

www.healthbenefitstimes.com/health-benefits-of-mace-spice

Health benefits of Mace Spice. Much like nutmeg, mace is in fact the bright, red webbing which surrounds the pit of the nutmeg fruit. It is usually eliminated, dried, and after that ground in to a powder which tastes much like nutmeg, yet a little more bitter having a hint of pepper.

www.thespruceeats.com/how-to-make-a-mace-substitute-4154040

Mace isn't a spice that you use every day, and it tends to be a bit pricey. When you come across a recipe that calls for it, save yourself some cash and cupboard space by using one of these substitutes in its place. Possible mace substitutes include nutmeg, allspice, cinnamon, ginger or pumpkin pie spice. It all depends on the recipe, and how ...

www.seriouseats.com/2011/09/spice-hunting-mace-nutmeg-substitute-spice.html

Mace doesn't get much love anymore, which is a big shame. In the golden age of the spice trade, mace strode across the skin of the world just like its cousin nutmeg. But it seems the modern age only has room for one magical sweet spice that seems to go with everything, and mace lost. Let's fix that.

www.thespruceeats.com/what-is-mace-1807031

The color of the spice can often help you determine the origin of mace. While orange-red blades tend to be from Indonesia, orange-yellow blades most likely come from Grenada, where mace is the national symbol and proudly emblazoned on the country's red, yellow, and green flag.