Web Results

www.reference.com/science/process-transpiration-1a9452ad657043d5

The process of transpiration is when water moves through plants from the roots to the leaves, then changes to vapor as it leaves the plant. Transpiration cools the plant and also provides it with nutrients, carbon dioxide and water.

www.reference.com/article/different-plants-transpire-different-rates-10f20c4f6bfa38a2

A single plant can transpire at different rates over the course of a day, depending on a number of factors, including temperature, relative humidity, wind and soil moisture. There are also species-specific differences, which can be broadly classified by the type of photosynthesis: C3, C4 or Crassula

www.reference.com/science/wind-affect-transpiration-3b17d52dc8baad57

When wind movement around a given plant increases, the rate of transpiration is bound to increase. The wind movement causes a rapid replacement of moist air with drier air around the given plant, which is why the rate of transpiration inevitably increases.

www.reference.com/science/transpiration-pull-theory-a619887f60bbc4e2

Transpiration pull theory is the proposed mechanism by which trees draw water through their roots. Transpiration occurs when the leaves of a tree allow water to exit into the air by means of tiny holes called stomata. When the water exits the leaves, the combination of capillary action, cohesion and

www.reference.com/article/difference-between-evaporation-transpiration-8e367e5a9ba31823

Although both are methods by which liquid water transitions into a gas, evaporation describes the process in which heat changes standing water into water vapor, while transpiration refers to the process plants undertake that draws water from the ground and releases it into the air.

www.reference.com/science/transpiration-affected-humidity-abc79baeb4e00c9e

When the relative humidity in a plant's environment rises, its rate of transpiration lowers, and a decrease in humidity causes the transpiration rate to rise. Air that is humid does not accept water vapor easily, and drier air makes it easier for a plant to release water by evaporation through the s

www.reference.com/science/water-cycle-1915fd103241fb59

The water cycle, also known as the hydrologic cycle, describes the process of how water moves through Earth's environment. In general, water evaporates from oceans, then it condenses in the atmosphere as water vapor cools. When enough water gathers in clouds, it precipitates back to the Earth's surf

www.reference.com/science/would-happen-water-cycle-stopped-7bca1a6d4fa63bbe

If the water cycle were to stop, lakes, rivers and groundwater sources would dry up, glaciers would disappear and precipitation would stop falling. All freshwater resources would be negatively impacted, and life on Earth would completely cease.

www.reference.com/science/water-cycle-work-9efe666259b6a480

The water cycle consists of three stages. The first is evaporation, as the sun's heat converts liquid water from rivers, lakes and oceans into water vapor. The second stage is condensation. As water vapor rises into the atmosphere, it cools and condenses into droplets of liquid water. Wind currents

www.reference.com/article/order-water-cycle-f1becd17951096d4

The water cycle has no definitive starting point, but the majority of the earth's water exists in the ocean. Therefore, many diagrams or explanations of the water cycle begin there. The stages of the water cycle include evaporation, transportation, condensation, precipitation, groundwater and run-of