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www.reference.com/article/modern-family-3e0fd3edea218702

Many modern families are unconventional and have similar challenges and triumphs, as portrayed on the popular sitcom, Modern Family. The show humorously depicts the life of family patriarch, Jay Pritchett, who is navigating a second chance at happiness with his much you...

www.reference.com/article/modern-computer-b78d1218b23bcc50

According to the Goodwill Community Foundation, a modern computer is an electronic device that has the ability to store, retrieve and process data. Modern computers can perform tasks such as word processing, web browsing and database management.

www.reference.com/article/modern-culture-b9b5e00011ed8c98

"Modern culture" refers to the shift in collective thought that took place with the rise in scientific advancements during the Renaissance. The shift continues into the contemporary age. The term is often erroneously used to describe the most current developments in soc...

www.reference.com/article/modern-art-dcb11fc55cb89500

Modern art, 1850-1970, is a school of thought in reaction against rationalism and mechanistic metaphors for society in the wake of the Industrial Revolution and the development of photography. Although modern artists commonly had classical training, many chose to reject...

www.reference.com/article/post-modern-family-f1f8d37aea9fc2ab

The post-modern family has adjusted to popular post-modernist experimentation in society. Role reversal among parents and espousing ideas from numerous sources, in general, characterize the post-modern family theory.

www.reference.com/article/modernization-theory-98badf79d24e0798

Modernization theory describes the development and process of modernization in societies, particularly in regard to the industrial societies of North America and Western Europe. It posits that the development of a society can be predicted in stages from its inception to...

www.reference.com/article/modern-periodic-law-ad18bd377eb968ee

Periodic law, also known as Mendeleev's law, is the concept that the chemical and physical properties of elements are based on an element's atomic weight when arranged by increasing periodic atomic number. Periodic law was first developed in 1869 when Dimitri Mendeleev ...