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www.u-s-history.com/pages/h245.html

The “Mexican Cession" refers to lands surrendered, or ceded, to the United States by Mexico at the end of the Mexican War. The terms of this transfer were spelled out in the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo of 1848.. To the United States, this massive land grab was significant because the question of extending slavery into newly acquired territories had become the leading national political issue.

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mexican_Cession

The Mexican Cession (529,000 sq. miles) was the third largest acquisition of territory in US history. The largest was the Louisiana Purchase, with some 827,000 sq. miles (including land from fifteen present U.S. states and two Canadian provinces), followed by the acquisition of Alaska (about 586,000 sq. miles).

theamericanhistory.fandom.com/wiki/The_Mexican_Cession

&nbsp The Mexican Cession of 1848 is a historical name in the United States for the region of the present day southwestern United States that Mexico ceded to the U.S. in 1848, excluding the areas east of the Rio Grande, which had been claimed by the Republic of Texas, though the Texas Annexation...

www.thomaslegion.net/americancivilwar/mexicancessionlessonstudentsandkids.html

The Mexican Cession, formally Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo, signed on February 2, 1848, was a T reaty between the United States and Mexico that ended the Mexican War.The Mexican Cession was signed at Villa de Guadalupe Hidalgo, which is located in northern Mexico City, the capital of Mexico.

www.encyclopedia.com/.../mexican-cession-1848

MEXICAN CESSION (1848) The Treaty of Guadalupe-Hidalgo was the peace treaty between the United States and Mexico that officially ended the Mexican War (1846 – 1848). The conflict lasted until the treaty was signed on February 2, 1848, in Guadalupe Hidalgo, a city in south central Mexico near Mexico City.

study.com/academy/lesson/mexican-cession-of-1848-definition-facts-map.html

The Mexican cession of 1848 yielded large dividends for the United States. Learn about what sparked American interest in Mexican territory, and what Mexico eventually transferred to the United States.

www.reference.com/geography/mexican-cession-fe50848cffb0c9b8

What Was the Mexican Cession? The Mexican Cession was the name given to the land, not including Texas, ceded to the United States by Mexico in the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo. This treaty officially ended the Mexican-American War.

learner.org/interactives/historymap/states_mexican.html

The treaty recognized Texas as a U.S. state, and ceded a large chunk of land — about half the area that belonged to the Mexican republic — to the United States for the cost of $15 million. The Mexican Cession included land that would later become California, Nevada, and Utah, as well as portions of Arizona, New Mexico, Colorado, and Wyoming.

www.ducksters.com/history/westward_expansion/mexican-american_war.php

History >> Westward Expansion The Mexican-American War was fought between the United States and Mexico from 1846 to 1848. It was primarily over the territory of Texas. Background Texas had been a state of the country of Mexico since 1821 when Mexico gained its independence from Spain. The Texans, however, began to disagree with the government of Mexico.

history.state.gov/milestones/1830-1860/texas-annexation

The Annexation of Texas, the Mexican-American War, and the Treaty of Guadalupe-Hidalgo, 1845–1848 During his tenure, U.S. President James K. Polk oversaw the greatest territorial expansion of the United States to date. Polk accomplished this through the annexation of Texas in 1845, the negotiation of the Oregon Treaty with Great Britain in 1846, and the conclusion of the Mexican-American War ...