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www.medicaldaily.com/antibiotic-resistance-history-373773

“The natural history of antibiotic resistance genes can be revealed through the phylogenetic reconstruction,” the authors of one study write, “and this kind of analysis suggests the long-term presence of genes conferring resistance to several classes of antibiotics in nature well before the antibiotic era.” In short, bacteria have ...

www.cdc.gov/drugresistance/about.html

Antibiotic resistance happens when germs like bacteria and fungi develop the ability to defeat the drugs designed to kill them. That means the germs are not killed and continue to grow. Infections caused by antibiotic-resistant germs are difficult, and sometimes impossible, to treat. In most cases, antibiotic-resistant infections require ...

www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3109405

The natural history of antibiotic resistance genes can be revealed through the phylogenetic reconstruction and this kind of analysis suggests the long-term presence of genes conferring resistance to several classes of antibiotics in nature well before the antibiotic era (Aminov and Mackie, 2007; Kobayashi et al., 2007).

mmbr.asm.org/content/74/3/417

SUMMARY Antibiotics have always been considered one of the wonder discoveries of the 20th century. This is true, but the real wonder is the rise of antibiotic resistance in hospitals, communities, and the environment concomitant with their use. The extraordinary genetic capacities of microbes have benefitted from man's overuse of antibiotics to exploit every source of resistance genes and ...

microbiologysociety.org/.../the-history-of-antibiotics.html

The history of antibiotics Antibiotics have been used for millennia to treat infections, although until the last century or so people did not know the infections were caused by bacteria. Various moulds and plant extracts were used to treat infections by some of the earliest civilisations – the ancient Egyptians, for example, applied mouldy ...

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Antibiotic_resistance

Antimicrobial resistance (AMR or AR) is the ability of a microbe to resist the effects of medication that once could successfully treat the microbe. The term antibiotic resistance (AR or ABR) is a subset of AMR, as it applies only to bacteria becoming resistant to antibiotics. Resistant microbes are more difficult to treat, requiring alternative medications or higher doses of antimicrobials.

www.britannica.com/science/antibiotic-resistance

Antibiotic resistance, loss of susceptibility of bacteria to the killing (bacteriocidal) or growth-inhibiting (bacteriostatic) properties of an antibiotic agent. When a resistant strain of bacteria is the dominant strain in an infection, the infection may be untreatable and life-threatening.

www.who.int/news-room/fact-sheets/detail/antibiotic-resistance

Antibiotic resistance is putting the achievements of modern medicine at risk. Organ transplantations, chemotherapy and surgeries such as caesarean sections become much more dangerous without effective antibiotics for the prevention and treatment of infections. WHO response. Tackling antibiotic resistance is a high priority for WHO.

www.statnews.com/2016/09/12/superbug-antibiotic-resistance-history

History also shows that if we want to tame antibiotic resistance, we have to be ready to fight for a long time — perhaps forever. The problem is that we’re not really fighting against bacteria.

www.cdc.gov/drugresistance

Antibiotic resistance is one of the biggest public health challenges of our time. Each year in the U.S., at least 2.8 million people get an antibiotic-resistant infection, and more than 35,000 people die. Fighting this threat is a public health priority that requires a collaborative global approach across sectors.