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www.thoughtco.com/dissolving-sugar-water-chemical-physical...

Dissolving sugar in water is an example of a physical change. Here's why: A chemical change produces new chemical products. In order for sugar in water to be a chemical change, something new would need to result. A chemical reaction would have to occur. However, mixing sugar and water simply produces... sugar in water!

www.answers.com/Q/Is_dissolving_of_sugar_in_water_a...

Dissolving sugar in water is a physical change. You can tell this because if you were to dissolve the sugar in water and then let the water evaporate, the sugar would still be left.

quizlet.com/98673886/chemistry-chapter-3-flash-cards

Start studying Chemistry Chapter 3. Learn vocabulary, terms, and more with flashcards, games, and other study tools. ... Physical or Chemical: Boiling Water. Physical. Physical or Chemical: Melting/ Freezing point. ... Physical or Chemical: Sugar dissolves in hot water. Chemical. Physical or Chemical: Sugar burns in a pot.

www.quora.com/When-we-dissolve-sugar-in-water-is-this-a...

When we dissolve sugar in water, is this a physical change or a chemical change? Why? Dissolving sugar in water is a physical change. Not a chemical change, because you can easily separate sugar from water. Dissolving SO3 gas in water is not a physical change because it forms Sulphuric acid. Separating SO3 gas from is not easy.

www.answers.com/Q/Is_sugar_dissolves_in_hot_water_a...

Dissolving sugar in water is a physical change. You can tell this because if you were to dissolve the sugar in water and then let the water evaporate, the sugar would still be left.

www.reference.com/science/sugar-dissolving-water-chemical...

Sugar dissolving in water is a physical change and not a chemical one. Chemical changes only occur when new substances form. Dissolving sugar in water does not cause a chemical reaction to take place. When sugar dissolves in water, the sucrose molecules remain intact, making this is a physical change.

www.answers.com/Q/Is_dissolving_sugar_in_coffee_a_physical...

Dissolving sugar in water is a physical change. You can tell this because if you were to dissolve the sugar in water and then let the water evaporate, the sugar would still be left.

www.inquiryinaction.org/chemistryreview/solids

A physical change is something that alters the form or appearance of a material without changing the chemical composition. For example: When water (H 2 O) changes from solid ice to liquid water, that is a physical change. The chemical makeup (hydrogen and oxygen) is not altered. When salt and sugar dissolve in water it is a physical change.

answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=20100925204132AAQQ1OB

When dissolving sugar there is no chemical reaction as such, the sugar molecules just fit in with the water molecules, there is no bond breaking and bond formation. And through evaporation you can get back the sugar and condensation of the water vapour gives you back the water used. That is a characteristic of a physical change.