The Krebs cycle occurs in the mitochondria of living cells. It's also called the citric acid cycle and the TCA cycle. The Krebs cycle is necessary for metabolism, in which cells change food into energy. More »

The Krebs cycle, also known as the citric acid cycle and the tricarboxylic acid cycle, is the central metabolic pathway that takes place in the mitochondrion and breaks down all metabolites, including sugars, fatty acids... More »

The end products of the Krebs cycle for every two molecules of pyruvic acid include 2 ATP molecules, 10 NADH molecules and two FADH2 molecules as well as six CO2 molecules in the form of waste gas. More »

The main function of the Krebs cycle is energy production, according to the Research Collaboratory for Structural Bioinformatics Protein Data Bank. The Krebs cycle, also known as the tricarboxylic acid cycle or the citri... More »

The Krebs cycle starts when acetyl CoA reacts with the compound oxaloacetate to form citrate and release coenzyme A, explains Encyclopedia Britannica. The Krebs cycle is also called the tricarboxylic acid cycle and the c... More »

The end products of the Krebs cycle for every two molecules of pyruvic acid include 2 ATP molecules, 10 NADH molecules and two FADH2 molecules as well as six CO2 molecules in the form of waste gas. More »

During each Krebs cycle, eight reactions should occur. As the reactions happen, the energy currency of the cell, adenosine triphosphate, known as ATP, is made. More »