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www.history.com/news/st-patricks-day-myths-debunked

Before you celebrate St. Patrick’s Day this weekend, get your facts straight by exploring common misconceptions about the holiday. Though one of Ireland’s patron saints, Patrick was born in ...

www.reference.com/world-view/saint-patrick-italian-9c3ef943dd743adc

There are many different legends of Saint Patrick, but Catholic Online states that his parents, Calpurnius and Conchessa, were Romans, making Saint Patrick of Italian decent, although he was born in Kilpatrick, Scotland. The History Channel states that it is unknown if Patrick's parents were Romans or of Celtic decent.

italoamericano.org/story/2015-3-16/Saint-Patrick

A “St. Patrick was Italian” remark, tossed into your March conversations, can ignite boring talk into boiling talk if you have some conversational fodder handy, to buttress your claim: The first St. Patrick’s Day in the U.S. was held in Boston in 1734. By stretching things a bit, you can correctly state that “St. Patrick was Italian”.

randazza.wordpress.com/2014/03/17/was-saint-patrick-really-italian

Growing up there, in a town where Sicilians were the plurality, St. Patrick’s Day was always a little underwhelming. Instead, we celebrated St. Joseph’s day on March 19. Of course, every St. Joseph’s Day, someone would bring up the old story that St. Patrick’s day should be “our” day too — since St. Patrick was really Italian.

www.answers.com/Q/Was_Saint_Patrick_an_Italian

St. Patrick was the son of Roman (Italian) parents who were living in Roman Britain, probably in Scotland. share: Is Saint Patrick a saint? Yes, Saint Patrick is a saint. That is why he has the ...

answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=20070316074948AADenxB

Best Answer: According to the Catholic Church, he was born in Scotland, around the area now known as Kilpatrick ("cell of Patrick") and his parents (Calpurnius and Conchessa) were Romans living in Britain to watch over colonies. Around the age of 14 he was captured as part of a raid and brought to Ireland until he escaped at age 20 back to Britain and his family.

slate.com/news-and-politics/2013/03/st-patrick-no-snakes-no-shamrocks-just-the...

The Irish have celebrated their patron saint with a quiet religious holiday for centuries, perhaps more than 1,000 years. It took the United States to turn St. Patrick’s Day into a boozy spectacle.

www.snopes.com

Snopes /snoʊps/ NOUN and sometimes VERB We are the internet’s go-to source for discerning what is true and what is total nonsense. Before you scroll further, a few tips on how to “snopes”:

www.nytimes.com/2017/03/17/us/irish-slaves-myth.html

Debunking a Myth: The Irish Were Not Slaves, Too Image This 1908 photograph of fishermen in the parish of St. John, Barbados, is often used to illustrate memes that falsely claim Irish people were ...

www.northjersey.com/.../03/12/st-patricks-day-who-st-patrick-he-italian/415902002

But was St. Patrick Italian? L’Italo-Americano, the biweekly Italian-American organization established in 1908, insists on its website italoamericano.org that Patrick was, indeed, a paisan.