In the state of New York, a squatter may gain adverse possession of a property if he occupies the land for a period of 10 years in a manner that is "actual, open and notorious, exclusive and continuous," according to the... More »

As of 2016, New York's laws concerning squatters' rights include that claimants cannot share the possessed land and must occupy it continuously for at least 10 years, according to Geeks On Finance. Also known as adverse ... More »

As of 2015, some of the rights that tenants have in New York City includes the right to livable premises, the right to complain and organize and the right to receive services. Other rights include the ability to transfer... More »

www.reference.com Business & Finance Real Estate

As of 2016, New York's laws concerning squatters' rights include that claimants cannot share the possessed land and must occupy it continuously for at least 10 years, according to Geeks On Finance. Also known as adverse ... More »

Squatter's rights refers to the right of a person to legally use an unoccupied property in the absence of attempts by the owner to evict the squatter. Over time, depending on the respective state laws, the squatter can g... More »

Squatters get the rights to a home if they meet three general criteria: living in a manner that is open, continuous and hostile for a certain number of years, according to HowStuffWorks. Squatters should pay property tax... More »

www.reference.com Business & Finance Real Estate

Squatter's rights confer ownership of real estate on a person who occupies someone else's property for a set amount of time, under certain conditions. The underlying legal principle is adverse possession, an idea that da... More »

www.reference.com Government & Politics Law