ARTICLES

Romeo and Juliet is widely regarded as one of William Shakespeare's greatest works. The play depicts a star-crossed romance that ends with the deaths of the main characters. With the city of fair Verona as the backdrop, ...

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A simile is used in Act 4, Scene 3, Line 39 of "Romeo and Juliet," when Juliet is describing her fear of waking up in the burial vault and compares it to "the horrible conceit of death and night." Juliet goes on to use a...

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Many of the best-known analogies are familiar sayings that have entered common use, such as being "a fish out of water" or "quiet as a mouse." Analogies are excellent ways to create comparisons between objects that may n...

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SIMILAR ARTICLES

An example of blank verse in William Shakespeare's "Romeo and Juliet" is: "And, when he shall die, / Take him and cut him out in little stars, / And he will make the face of heaven so fine / That all the world will be in...

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William Shakespeare's "Romeo and Juliet" is generally regarded as a tragedy because it features dramatic and devastating events when the two main protagonists die at the end. It doesn't, however, fit the conventional mod...

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William Shakespeare's "Romeo and Juliet" is filled with examples of hyperbole, such as when Romeo says that "[t]he brightness of [Juliet's] cheek would shame those stars, / As daylight doth a lamp; her eyes in heaven / W...

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William Shakespeare uses a metaphor in "Romeo and Juliet" when Lady Capulet compares Paris to a book. Two other examples occur when Romeo compares Juliet to the sun and when Paris compares Juliet to a flower and her tomb...

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