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www.physio-pedia.com/Slipped_Capital_Femoral_Epiphysis

Slipped Capital Femoral Epiphysis (SCFE) is the most common hip disorder affecting adolescents.[1] It is a disorder of the immature hip in which anatomic disruption occurs through the proximal femoral physis. It is characterized by a posterior displacement of the epiphysis through the hypertrophic zone with the metaphysis taking on an anterior and superior position.[2].

www.moveforwardpt.com/SymptomsConditionsDetail.aspx?cid=839455bc-d...

Slipped capital femoral epiphysis (SCFE) is the most common hip disorder seen in adolescents. It affects 10 in every 100,000 children in the United States. Although its cause is unknown, SCFE may be related to the onset of puberty, body mass and obesity, trauma, or other factors.

www.catonsvillephysicaltherapy.com/Injuries-Conditions/Pediatric/...

Physical Therapy in Catonsville and Sykesville for Pediatric Issues. Welcome to Catonsville and Sykesville Physical Therapy’s resource about slipped capital femoral epiphysis. Slipped capital femoral epiphysis (SCFE) is a condition that affects the hip in teenagers between the ages of 12 and 16 most often.

www.centralksphysicaltherapy.com/Injuries-Conditions/Pediatric/...

Physical Therapy in Great Bend for Pediatric Issues. Welcome to Central Kansas Orthopedic Group’s resource about slipped capital femoral epiphysis. Slipped capital femoral epiphysis (SCFE) is a condition that affects the hip in teenagers between the ages of 12 and 16 most often. Cases have been reported as early as age nine years old.

www.massgeneral.org/.../slipped_capital_femoral_epiphysis.aspx

Additional information about Slipped Capital Femoral Epiphysis: The majority of patients with a slipped capital femoral epiphysis will be able to return to most sports and activities at approximately 3-6 months post-operatively. Removing the hardware is not necessary unless the patient develops pain or there is a problem with the screw itself.

www.orthopedicsforkids.com/PDFs/Pelvis/SCFE 2009.pdf

SLIPPED CAPITAL FEMORAL EPIPHYSIS (SCFE) Slipped capital femoral epiphysis (SCFE) is an unusual but not rare disorder of the adolescent hip. For reasons that are not well understood, the ball at the upper end of the femur (thigh bone) slips off in a backward direction due to weakness of the growth plate. It develops most

www.gillettechildrens.org/conditions-care/slipped-capital...

Slipped Capital Femoral Epiphysis (SCFE) is a hip condition that occurs when the ball at the top of the thigh bone (also known as the femoral head) slips backwards, away from the lower portion of the thigh bone. SCFE usually occurs in one hip, but both hips can be affected in 20 to 40 percent of people with SCFE.

orthoinfo.aaos.org/.../slipped-capital-femoral-epiphysis-scfe

Slipped capital femoral epiphysis (SCFE) is a hip condition that occurs in teens and pre-teens who are still growing. For reasons that are not well understood, the ball at the head of the femur (thighbone) slips off the neck of the bone in a backwards direction. This causes pain, stiffness, and instability in the affected hip.

www.alterg.com/case-study/slipped-capital-femoral-epiphysis

was treated as a groin strain, but later it was determined that he had a slipped capital femoral epiphysis. Patient underwent surgery to fixate in May and was referred to physical therapy 3 months later. Patient wants to return to high school sports of basketball, football, and baseball. History Patient first felt hip pain while playing ...

www.briancolemd.com/rehab-protocols

Rehab Protocols. To serve as a guide to physical therapy following your surgery, this section contains rehabilitation protocols specific to your procedure. Please note these are meant to be guidelines for rehabilitation to be followed by a certified physical or occupational therapist.